Agenda and minutes

Agenda and minutes

Executive - Wednesday, 15th September, 2021 2.00 pm

Venue: Council Chamber, Level 2, Town Hall Extension. View directions

Contact: Michael Williamson  This meeting can be viewed on Vimeo at https://vimeo.com/587808267

Items
No. Item

83.

Minutes pdf icon PDF 174 KB

To approve as a correct record the minutes of the meeting held on 28 July 2021.

Minutes:

Decision

 

The Executive approve as a correct record the minutes of the meeting on 28 July 2021.

84.

COVID 19 Public Health & Economic Recovery updates pdf icon PDF 127 KB

Report of the Director of Public Health the Director of City Centre Growth and Infrastructure attached

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Executive considered a report of the Director of Public Health and the Director of City Centre Growth and Infrastructure, which provided an update on the COVID-19 situation within the city and the progress that was being made with the city’s economic recovery.

 

The Executive Member for Health and Care advised that infection rates within the city were now 289.7 per 100,000 population and Manchester was currently 9th amongst Greater Manchester’s Local Authorities in terms of infection rates, with rates remaining stable over the last week and the infection rate amongst the over 60’s was 191.4 per 100,000 which put Manchester 8th across Greater Manchester.

 

It was noted however, that the full impact of the return of children to schools and students to colleges and universities had yet to be felt and rates were expected to rise again throughout September and in order to mitigate against this the COVID-19 12 Point Plan for the City had been refreshed with the aim to help reduce pressure on the health and social care system in Manchester.

 

The Executive Member for Health and Care also reported that a vaccination programme for 12 to 15 year olds and booster vaccinations for those over 50 or anyone who had a health condition would commence as of next week and the vaccination offer was still in place for all residents. 

 

In relation to the city’s economic recovery, the Director of City Centre Growth and Infrastructure advised that there was continued pressures around recruitment, especially in the hostility and entertainment sectors.  It was also reported that there would be additional pressures to the city’s economy as the national furlough scheme came to an end at the end of September 2021.

 

It was reported that whilst the city’s construction sector was buoyant, with a strong pipeline of development there was the possibility of a shortage of materials in the supply chain and although Office take up in the city centre was positive, the use of public transport was at approximately 70% of pre-COVID-19 levels.

 

The Director of City Centre Growth and Infrastructure concluded positively reporting that Manchester had been named the third best city in the world, coming behind San Francisco and Amsterdam by media brand Time Out, who surveyed 27,000 people, looking at nightlife, restaurants, and cultural highlights.  Manchester’s ability to come together through difficult times was applauded and reference to the Manchester International Festival (MIF), Grayson’s Art Club and The Factory described the city as “creative” and the city was also commended for its “general great vibes”.

 

Decision

 

The Executive note the update.

85.

Our Manchester - Progress Update pdf icon PDF 321 KB

Report of the Chief Executive attached

Minutes:

The Executive considered a report of the Chief Executive which provided an update on key areas of progress against the Our Manchester Strategy – Forward to 2025 which reset Manchester’s priorities for the next five years to ensure the Council could still achieve the city’s ambition set out in the Our Manchester Strategy 2016 – 2025.

 

The Deputy Leader (Human Resources) provided an update on the work being undertaken to tackle homelessness advising that the Council had embarked on five key projects designed to shift the balance further from response to prevention, see fewer people in temporary accommodation and achieve better results for those who do end up there.  He commented that over the past few years, the Council’s Homelessness service had responded to exponentially growing need and, more recently, the challenges of the pandemic and these challenges were only likely to grow as the impact of an end to the eviction ban during the pandemic and the removal of the £20 uplift in Universal Credit came into effect.

 

The Executive Member for Environment provided an update on the progress being made on the Greater Manchester Electric Vehicle Charging Infrastructure strategy.  The strategy, which complemented the region’s 2040 Transport Strategy, set out a vision to make Greater Manchester an exemplar city region so that by 2030 residents, businesses and visitors would be able choose to travel by electric car or van with the confidence that they could conveniently re-charge their vehicles. This in turn would help improve air quality and support the wider goal of Manchester, and the wider region, becoming zero carbon by 2038 at the latest.

 

The Executive Member for Housing and Employment provided an update on the steps being taken to reduce the Council’s carbon emissions.  He advised around 300 council-owned homes in Newton Heath and Higher Blackley would receive £15m worth of sustainability improvements, benefitting from measures such as new heat pump systems, new radiators to replace existing gas heating systems, triple glazing, extra insulation and the installation of renewable, low energy lighting where needed in order to save 750 tonnes of carbon emissions a year.  He also advised that since 2005, Northwards Housing had spent £80m on making Manchester City Council-owned homes more energy efficient, reducing carbon emissions from them by 48%.

 

The Executive Member for Health and Care provided an update on the Carers Manchester Contact Point helpline, which had been set up to provide support and advice to unpaid carers in the city.  The Contact Point, set up in collaboration between Manchester Local Care Organisation adult social care commissioners and local voluntary and community sector organisations, had helped more than 1,000 different carers since it was set up in August 2020 – in the midst of the Covid-19 pandemic.

 

The Leader commented that it was important that the city had been recognised as the 3rd best city in the world by Time Out magazine with many of the themes of the Our Manchester Strategy coming together in the findings of a survey  ...  view the full minutes text for item 85.

86.

Capital Programme Update pdf icon PDF 323 KB

Report of the Deputy Chief Executive and City Treasurer attached

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Executive considered a report of the Deputy Chief Executive and City Treasurer, which informed Members of requests to increase the capital programme.   The report also sought approval for those schemes that could be approved under authority delegated to the Executive and asked the Executive to recommend to Council proposals that required specific Council approval.

 

The proposals which required Council approval were those which were funded by the use of reserves above a cumulative total of £2million, where the use of borrowing was required or a virement exceeds £0.5m. These included the following proposed changes:-

 

·                Children’s Services – Manchester Creative Media Arts Academy Completion Works.  A capital budget increase of £0.661m was requested, funded by borrowing for completion of the outstanding works; and

·                Growth and Development – Manchester Equipment and Adaptations Partnership (MEAP) Relocation.  A capital budget virement of £2.025m was requested, funded by the Asset Management Programme budget for the service to consolidate their operation from Poland Street, Tulketh Street and Fulmead, providing them with a fit for purpose operational property and the space for a Smart House which was pivotal to the Prevention and Early Intervention Agenda.

 

The report then went on to detail the proposals that did not require Council approval which were funded by the use of external resources, use of capital receipts, use of reserves below £2million, where the proposal could be funded from existing revenue budgets or where the use of borrowing on a spend to save basis was required.  These included:-

 

·                Private Sector Housing – Rough Sleepers Accommodation Programme (RSAP) Property Acquisitions.  A capital budget increase of £3m was requested, funded by £1.350m Government Grant and £1.650m Capital receipts to acquire 20 x 1bed flats to support 20 rough sleepers and people living in emergency accommodation to move-on to new homes;

 

The report highlighted that there had been increases to the programme totalling £0.320m as a result of delegated approvals since the previous report to the Executive on 28 July 2021 and if the recommendations in the report were approved, the General Fund capital budget would increase by £3.661m across financial years which would also result in an increase in the prudential indicator for Capital Expenditure in corresponding years.

 

Approval had also been given for a capital budget virement from the Parks Development Programme budget totalling £0.960m for the Parks In Partnership Scheme. This project would carry out improvement works to Manchester’s parks and green spaces, across 32 wards, that raised standards and sustainability within parks, whilst widening participation, access and inclusivity

 

It was also reported that detailed designs for the Public Sector Decarbonisation Scheme (PSDS) funded works were currently being developed. Early indications were that the programme would come in underbudget although the final position would not be confirmed until designs were completed and cost plans wee finalised in late September 2021.  In anticipation of an underspend on the PSDS budget, the programme had been working on a pipeline of additional projects that could delivered rather than returning funds unspent.  The  ...  view the full minutes text for item 86.

87.

Revenue Monitoring to the end of July 2021 (P4) pdf icon PDF 238 KB

Report of the Deputy Chief Executive and City Treasurer attached

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Executive considered a report of the Deputy Chief Executive and City Treasurer, which outlined the projected outturn position for 2021/22, based on expenditure and income activity as at the end of July 2021 and future projections.   

 

The report identified a forecasted underspend of £2.558m for 2021/22, based on activity to date and projected trends in income and expenditure, and included the financial implications of COVID-19, government funding confirmed to date and other changes. 

 

However it was noted that the anticipated implications of COVID-19 would have a significant impact on the Council’s finances for a number of years.  With the likely scale of funding pressures and future resource reductions, it was important that the Council held a robust position on reserves and maintained the ability to deal with issues that arose during the financial year.

 

The Deputy Leader (Finance) commented that the Government’s increase in employee National Insurance contributions and reliance on long term efficiencies and the social care precept to address the funding gap in Adult Social Care (ASC) was lacking in a long term vision and this Council would continue to push the Government for an adequate and fair long term vision and plan for ASC.

 

Decisions

 

The Executive:-

 

(1)      Notes the global revenue monitoring report and forecast outturn position which is showing a £2.558m underspend.

(2)      Approve budget virements to be reflected in the budget as outline in paragraph 2.7 of the report.

(3)      Approve additional COVID-19 grants to be reflected in the budget as outlined in paragraphs 2.9 to 2.19 of the report.

(4)      Approve the use of unbudgeted external grant funding (non COVID-19) as outlined in paragraph 2.12 of the report.

(5)      Approve the use of budgets to be allocated as outline in paragraph 2.13 of the report

88.

The National Football Museum pdf icon PDF 398 KB

Report of the Strategic Director – Neighbourhoods attached

 

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Executive considered a report of the Strategic Director (Neighbourhoods), which set out plans for a new lease and grant funding agreement for the National Football Museum, taking into account the Council’s investment to date, the museum’s impact and achievements over the last ten years, and plans for the next funding period.

 

The National Football Museum was England’s only national museum for football and at the heart of its practice held a nationally accredited collection which was the largest of its kind in the world and over the last 10 years had played an important role in establishing Manchester as an international sporting city.

 

The head lease between Manchester City Council and the Millennium Quarter Trust, was established in 2002 to oversee the area of the city centre comprising Cathedral Gardens, Exchange Square, the Cathedral Visitor Centre and Urbis.  The Millennium Quarter Trust sublet the Urbis building to the National Football Museum.  The current sublease was for a 10 year term, coterminous with the existing grant agreement and is due to expire on 4 July 2022. In order to provide assurance to the museum during this unprecedented time of instability during the pandemic, a new Agreement for Lease would be signed in Autumn 2021 (on the same terms as the existing 10 year sublease) to enable the 25 year sublease to commence on 1 April 2022, in tandem with a new funding agreement, commencing from the same date for the National Football Museum. 

 

The new grant funding agreement would be for a period of three years from 1 April 2022. The agreement set out an annual tapering of the current £1.45million allocation and would enable the museum to have time to progress the work outlined in the report, and to make a substantial impact in terms of delivery of the Strategic Plan and Transformation Project - including investment in exhibition spaces, audience development, carbon reduction, digital strategy and fundraising and income diversification.

 

Decisions

 

The Executive:-

 

(1)      Approve the granting of a new Sub Lease between the Millennium Quarter Trust and the National Football Museum for a period of 25 years from 1 April 2022, which will be granted out of the lease dated 5 July 2012 between Manchester City Council and the Millennium Quarter Trust for a term of 85 years from 27 June 2002 (“the Head Lease”).

 

(2)      Approve a three year grant funding agreement with the National Football Museum from 1 April 2022 with revenue support of £1.4million in 2022/23, £1.35million in 2023/24 and £1.25million in 2024/25.

 

(3)      Delegates responsibility to the Strategic Director (Neighbourhoods), Deputy Chief Executive and City Treasurer and the City Solicitor in consultation with the two Deputy Leaders to negotiate and finalise the terms of the arrangements.

 

(4)      Authorises the City Solicitor to complete all documents and enter into all agreements necessary to give effect to the recommendations.

 

 

89.

Manchester's Digital Strategy pdf icon PDF 241 KB

Report of the Director of Inclusive Economy attached

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Executive considered a report of the Director of Inclusive Economy, which sought approval for the adoption of the Manchester Digital Strategy, which set out how the Council would use digital and technology to meet the priorities of the Our Manchester Strategy and achieve its ambition of being in the top flight of world class cities by 2025.

 

An extensive consultation process took place from September 2020 to March 2021 with business, public and VCSE sectors and community organisations and networks.  The consultation and development process led to the strategy being divided into four themes.

 

·                Smart people – everyone able to gain and sustain the skills, aspirations, and confidence to fully participate in the digital world ;

·                Digital places – providing access, connectivity and support for all residents and businesses and digitally enabling enhanced health and wellbeing;

·                Future prosperity – to attract new digital businesses & sectors and support a resilient and inclusive economy; and

·                Sustainable resilience – meet zero carbon and climate resilience goals and to create open inclusive connectivity with enhanced digital infrastructure as a utility not just a commodity.

 

These themes were intended to align with the city’s existing priorities, particularly the Our Manchester Strategy and the Local Industrial Strategy and it was anticipated that these themes would keep Manchester at the forefront of technological change in a way that was sustainable and accessible to everyone.

 

It was reported that the delivery of the Strategy would be overseen by a Digital Strategy Governance Board, comprising of relevant Council Officers alongside representatives from external partner organisations and networks and the final strategy document would undergo design work to make it more readable and presentable to a wider audience following agreement on its content and adoption.

 

The Leader commented that whilst the city was recognised for its ability to draw direct investment into the city through its digital sector, the Strategy would also need to ensure it addressed the growth in unemployment in the city’s older population in order to maintain the level of investment it received.

 

Decision

 

The Executive agrees to adopt the Manchester Digital Strategy as part the City’s policy framework.

90.

Manchester's support for families living in poverty pdf icon PDF 437 KB

Report of the Deputy Chief Executive & City Treasurer and Director of Inclusive Economy attached

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Executive considered a report of the Director of Inclusive Economy, which highlighted the breadth of work undertaken by the Council and our partners to tackle the issue of poverty including progress made to date and the importance of maintaining a focus on tackling poverty for the future.

 

Poverty in Manchester was a huge challenge and continued to have a significant impact on the life and outcomes of too many of the city’s residents. In the 2019 Index of Multiple Deprivation (IMD), Manchester was ranked as the 6th most deprived local authority in the country.  This was reflected in the number of children living in poverty.  At the end of March 2020, the End Child Poverty Coalition estimated that around 46,700 children (42%) in Manchester were living in poverty.  The scale of the challenge had been further exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic which caused a 90% rise in claimant unemployment (unemployed people claiming benefits) between March and May 2019. This rise was reflected in the demand for food support, with the Council’s food response team delivering food parcels to an average of 250 households a week.

 

Since the launch of the Family Poverty Strategy in 2017, good progress had been made, and the report highlighted a wide range of examples of current activity and best practice across various service areas.

 

Poverty remained a difficult challenge for Manchester and affects the life-chances and outcomes of too many of our residents.  The Our Manchester Strategy recognised through the fair and equitable city theme the need  to work hard to make sure that Manchester residents, particularly those most vulnerable were connected to those opportunities as the best way of building wealth and reducing poverty. 

 

The Executive Member for Health and Care stressed the Council’s commitment to addressing poverty within the city.  It was noted that the Council had always responded to the challenge using direct and targeted programmes of work. It had redoubled its efforts in response to the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, which came at a cost of £56m for 2020/21 and was forecast to cost £144m over 2021/22. As well as specific interventions, the Council had supported people experiencing poverty through our wider range of core services. 

 

To mitigate against and reduce poverty in the city, the Council would need to continue to provide residents with a wide ranging and extensive support offer, not just in tackling the causes and symptoms of poverty, but also in making sure that families could participate in cultural and leisure activities that improved quality of life. 

 

The Assistant Executive Member for Antipoverty advised that in 2022, the Council had the opportunity to refresh the current Family Poverty Strategy 2017-22 to ensure it was fit for purpose, had the greatest possible impact and targeted a broader cohort of residents.  He advised that he would be leading on the process to refresh the strategy would begin in early 2022, and like the original strategy would place significant emphasis on listening to and learning from the  ...  view the full minutes text for item 90.

91.

Development Strategy for the Back of Ancoats - Progress Update Report pdf icon PDF 905 KB

Report of the Director of City Centre Growth and Infrastructure attached

Minutes:

The Executive considered a report of the Director of City Centre Growth and Infrastructure, which provided an update on the activities to bring forward investment and development in the next phases of sustainable growth in the Ancoats area since the preparation of a Neighbourhood Development Framework (NDF) in July 2020.

 

The Executive Member for Housing and Employment reported that the next phase of investment and development would create a forward looking, low carbon neighbourhood for aspirational young people and families along with balanced approaches to providing a mix of tenure.  A sequenced programme of development would help to meet the comprehensive needs of a changing resident and working population in east Manchester, adjacent to the regional centre with all of its employment and cultural attractions.

 

A range of development proposals linked to the Ancoats Mobility Hub (AMH) and a wider public realm strategy were all being progressed, details of which were provided in the report. 

 

Other sites in a mix of ownerships were also being prepared for future development and Planning consent had already been gained for key components of the plan, but further land assembly would be necessary to achieve the required comprehensive approach. 

 

It was also reported that the public realm strategy integrated with further land assembly would be required and co-ordination of transport and movement interventions would deliver the next high quality, sustainable phase of neighbourhood development in Ancoats.

 

The Leader commented that what had been achieved in the redevelopment of Ancoats, especially in the last five years, had been the most amazing transformation of a  neighbourhood that had been seen in the city and there was now a real opportunity to build on the redevelopment that had taken place to date

 

Decisions

 

The Executive:-

 

(1)      Note the progress being made to bring forward sustainable development at the Back of Ancoats.

 

(2)      Note the progress made to gain planning permission and complete site assembly to support the realisation of the Ancoats Mobility Hub (AMH) and that a further report will be brought to the Executive in due course that sets out proposals for the delivery and operation of the AMH. 

 

(3)      Note progress towards the preparation of a public realm strategy integrated with the next phases of development and that the draft strategy will be brought back to the Executive in 2021 prior to undertaking stakeholder consultation. 

 

(4)      Note that £4.7 million is being sought from the Brownfield Land Fund administered by the Greater Manchester Combined Authority to undertake public realm works in the Back of Ancoats. 

 

(5)      Agree to delegate approval of the funding agreement to the Deputy Chief Executive and City Treasurer.

 

(6)      Endorse the on-going collaboration with landowners to support delivery of the sustainable place making vision of the Back of Ancoats. 

 

(7)      Note that a number of remaining land and property acquisitions are still required to achieve the overall vision of the NDF.

 

(8)      Note that if the Council is unable to secure the voluntary acquisition of outstanding  ...  view the full minutes text for item 91.

92.

Climate Change Action Plan Annual Report 2020-21 and Work Programme 2021-22 pdf icon PDF 243 KB

Report of the Deputy Chief Executive and City Treasurer attached

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Executive considered a report of the Deputy Chief Executive and City Treasurer, which provides an update on the progress that has been made in delivering the Climate Change Action Plan (CCAP) during the first year (CCAP Annual Report 2020-21) and the work programme for the second year of the Action Plan (CCAP Work Programme 2021-22).

 

Overall, the Council’s direct emissions had reduced by 21% (-6,783 tonnes CO2) compared to 2019/20 and against an annual target to reduce emissions by 13%.  The Work Programme for 2021/22, outlined the key CCAP actions, or critical milestones, which were to be delivered during this period categorised under the five work streams:-

 

·                Buildings and Energy;

·                Transport and Travel;

·                Reducing Consumption Based Emissions;

·                Climate Adaptation; and

·                Catalysing Change.

 

The work programme took account of a small number of actions that were delayed last year due to the COVID-19 pandemic and incorporated milestones for new projects, such as the Public Sector Decarbonisation Scheme, the Social Housing Decarbonisation Fund and the ‘In Our Nature’ communities programme, none of which had featured in the original CCAP 2020-25.

 

It was also reported that there was wider activity underway across the council that was not reflected within this plan including the Manchester Economic Recovery and Investment Plan and the Green & Blue Infrastructure Strategy

 

The Executive Member for Environment highlighted the importance of the Catalysing change workstream and the Council’s role in influencing, which could not be done in isolation and it was acknowledged that Manchester Climate Change Agency (MCCA) was key to realising this and achieving the targets that had been set.

 

The Leader sought clarity on the concerns that had been raised at the Environment and Climate Change Scrutiny Committee in relation to the capacity and ability of the MCCA to lead and deliver on such an important issue for the city.  The Executive Member for Environment advised that the Manchester Climate Change Partnership (MCCP) and MCCA enabled the Council to be affective and contribute to “Catalysing Change” workstream.  She reminded members that the Council was only responsible for a minor part of the city’s emissions and it would not be possible for the Council to have the impact and deliver what was required in addressing climate change for the city if it was to try to do so on its own.

 

Decision

 

The Executive note the progress that has been made in delivering the Action Plan during the first year (CCAP Annual Report 2020-21) and the work programme for the second year of the Action Plan (CCAP Work Programme 2021-22).

93.

Closure of Wythenshawe Indoor Market pdf icon PDF 282 KB

Report of the Strategic Director – Neighbourhoods attached

 

Minutes:

The Executive considered a report of the Strategic Director (Neighbourhoods), which informed Members of the intended closure of Wythenshawe Indoor Market.

 

The Executive member for Neighbourhoods explained that as pat of the budget proposals for 2021/22 , the closure of the indoor market in Wythenshawe had been proposed as it required an ongoing subsidy of c.£110k per annum to continue to operate.  It had been agreed to continue to operate the market for a period of six months to provide the opportunity to attract more traders and evidence that the market could be made financially sustainable.

 

It was reported that here had been no improvement in the sustainability of the indoor market since April 2021 and a number of traders had already vacated into alternative premises.  There were currently only four traders remaining on the market, one of which had indicated that they would be retiring when the market closed and alternative trading opportunities for the three remaining traders on the other retail markets had been made available.

 

It was therefore confirmed that the closure would go ahead by the end of September 2021, in line with the agreed budget savings.

 

It was also reported that the lease for the current indoor market was being considered by the Strategic Development team in the context of the potential redevelopment of the district centre.  Discussions would take place with the landlord around the current obligations within the lease and any amendments or surrender that may be required.  Work was also being commissioned from a specialist provider to create recommendations for a potential new food and drink offer in Wythenshawe that would meet the needs of the residents and the local economy; and deliver enhanced social impact.  This work would include consultations with local residents, community groups, businesses and other stakeholders.

 

Decision

 

The Executive note the closure of Wythenshawe indoor market at the end of September 2021

94.

This City: Manchester's Housing Delivery Vehicle pdf icon PDF 354 KB

Report of the Deputy Chief Executive and City Treasurer attached

 

Minutes:

The Executive considered a report of the Deputy Chief Executive and City Treasurer, which provided an update on progress to date, outlining the intention to deliver the first two Council housing schemes through the wholly owned Council Housing Delivery Vehicle (HDV) which was to be called This City.

 

The creation of a HDV aimed to boost housing supply within the city and offering a range of tenures across a number of different housing markets to support the achievement of the Council’s residential growth targets and provide homes that were truly accessible to Manchester residents

 

A £1.5m development budget had been allocated in order to progress activity in relation to the establishment of This City. To date, there were commitments of £1.2m, including a 10% contingency, with c£500k of the budget committed towards design fees for the first two schemes, with the remaining budget allocated to cover a range of surveys, investigations and professional advice to ensure that the approach to This City was well informed and officers had relevant advice in order to develop the company within the appropriate legal and legislatory parameters.

 

The Executive Member for Housing and Employment advised that as part of the first phase of development, it was intended to deliver 204 new homes across the Ancoats and Beswick and Piccadilly Wards, with at least 54 of these new homes being let at an accessible rent, which would be set at or below Local Housing Allowance levels.

 

The Executive Member for Housing and Employment advised that in order to maintain momentum with the design work on these schemes, the Executive was requested to approve funding of £0.347m to cover design team fees until the end of December 2021, when there would be critical checkpoint dates on both schemes in order for the Executive to agree next steps for development and delivery.

 

For phase 2 and beyond, it was intended that This City would seek an investment partner to work with to drive forward new developments, rather than fund through further PWLB debt. Any new schemes which would be delivered in partnership with an investor would still seek to follow the core principles of This City, namely the development of new, high quality, sustainable homes which would be accessible to the people of Manchester.

 

Decisions

 

The Executive:-

 

(1)      Note the progress made to date with the creation of This City Housing Delivery Vehicle.

 

(2)      Note that a further report will be presented to the Executive outlining a detailed business case and financial proposal for the delivery of the first two schemes under This City.

 

(3)      Approve an increase to the capital budget of £0.347m to cover design team fees for the continued development of proposals for the first phase of delivery, to be funded from borrowing, noting that it is expected that this will be recoverable from This City once it is established.