Manchester City Council

Agenda and minutes

Agenda and minutes

Economy Scrutiny Committee - Thursday, 9th January, 2020 10.00 am

Venue: Council Antechamber, Level 2, Town Hall Extension

Contact: Michael Williamson 

Media

Items
No. Item

1.

Minutes pdf icon PDF 241 KB

To approve as a correct record the minutes of the meeting held on 5 December 2019.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Decision

 

To approve the minutes of the meeting held on the 5 December 2019 as a correct record.

2.

The Council's Updated Financial Strategy and Budget reports 2020/21 pdf icon PDF 275 KB

Report of the Chief Executive and the Deputy Chief Executive and City Treasurer attached

 

This report provides an update on the Council’s overall financial position and sets out the next steps in the budget process, including scrutiny of the draft Budget proposals and Budget report by this Committee.  Each Scrutiny Committee will receive a budget report aligned to its remit.  The report also outlines the officer proposals for how the Council could deliver a balanced budget for 2020/21, the details of which will be discussed at the relevant scrutiny committees.

 

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Committee considered a report of the Chief Executive and the Deputy Chief Executive and City Treasurer, which provided an update on the Council’s overall financial position and set out the next steps in the budget process.  In doing so, the report outlined Officer proposals for how the Council could deliver a balanced budget for 2020/21.

 

In conjunction to the above, the Committee also received and considered the draft Council Business Plan for 2020/21 and the Growth and Development medium term financial plan (MTFP) and budget proposals for 2020/21.

 

Officers highlighted that the 2020/21 budget would be a one year roll over budget.  It would reflect the fact the Council had declared a climate emergency and would also continue to reflect the priorities identified in the previous three-year budget strategy.

 

Taken together, the reports and the MTFP illustrated how the directorate would work to deliver the Our Corporate Plan and progress towards the vision set out in the Our Manchester Strategy.

 

Some of the key points that arose from the Committees discussions were:-

 

·                An explanation was sought as to of the difference between the Growth and Development Directorate’s gross budget of £57.6m and net budget of £8.179m;

·                Were the base budget figures within the Growth and Development budget based on the original budget proposed at the start of the financial year or revised figures;

·                Clarification was sough if any further investment was planned past 2020/21 for highways maintenance;

·                What assessment had been undertaken in balancing the risk in increasing the service charge relating to New Smithfield Market and ensuring there was not a reduction in market traders;

·                Could further information be provided in relation to equalities and diversity within the Business Plans, with specific reference to a commitment to diversity at senior levels;

·                Had any consideration been given to other alternative KPI’s for markets other than the income generated for the Council, such as the local economic impact;

·                As part of the proposed 2020/21 budget, what investment, if any, was proposed within the Council’s estate to reflect the actions needed to comply with climate emergency the Council declared in July 2019;

·                Clarification was sought as to whether the additional funding resource for Lloyd Street public conveniences for 2020/21 had been secured;

·                What was the timescale for the proposed improvements to Whythenshawe markets.

 

The Head of Finance for Corporate Services, Neighbourhoods

and Growth and Development explained that the gross budget figures included all expenditure items such as staffing, premises and operating costs, whereas the net budget figures was the what was left of the gross budget once it had been offset by any income, grants or other external contributions.  In terms of the budget figures, he advised that the figures were based on the latest figures, which had been adjusted in year to reflect know changes in inflation.   

 

The Strategic Director (Growth and Development) commented that there was provision within the 2020/21 capital programme for highway improvements and as part of the forward capital strategy, further commitments into highways would be  ...  view the full minutes text for item 2.

3.

The City's Future Economy and Labour Market Requirements pdf icon PDF 550 KB

Report of the Head of Work and Skills attached

 

This report provides information on the City’s current Labour Market using the data and intelligence that is currently available, providing an overview of skills demand and supply.  The report sets out some of the work in which the Council and its partners are connecting residents to opportunities arising from the city’s growth, as well as ensuring businesses have access to the skills they need to grow.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Committee considered a report of the Head of Work and Skills, which provided information on the city’s current labour market using the data and intelligence that was currently available, providing an overview of skills demand and supply.  The report set out some of the work in which the Council and its partners were connecting residents to opportunities arising from the city’s growth, as well as ensuring businesses had access to the skills they needed to grow.

 

The Head of Work and Skills referred to the main points and themes within the report, which included:-

 

·                A number of external factors (ranging from global, to national and local) were impacting on UK economies and more specifically Manchester’s economy, which was resulting in industry skills needs moving and changing faster than the skills sector;

·                An overview of Manchester’s current labour market and employment by broad industry;

·                Areas of anticipated future growth and demand that would drive the city’s growth and productivity;

·                The need for a highly skilled workforce which would be fundamental to Manchester’s economic growth;

·                A talent pipeline needed to be developed to enable employers to grow their own talent from within the city to meet their future growth ambitions

·                An overview of Manchester residents’ performance within Further, Higher and Adult Education provision;

·                Employers in key-growth sectors were increasingly recognising the need to work in partnership with training providers to develop higher-level roles for their industries aligned to apprenticeship standards, which were lacking in some sectors;

·                The Apprenticeship Levy had brought major change to the apprenticeship market and whilst it was introduced to increase take-up, the trend nationally has been a continued decline; and

·                How the Council was responding to the skills challenges through the Our Manchester Industrial Strategy and the Work and Skills Strategy 2016/20.

 

Some of the key points that arose from the Committees discussions were:-

 

·                As there was not a direct match between the sectors identified as unique and an asset to the region and the sectors that had been identified as key growth sectors, it was queried as to where the Council should prioritise for skills and investment - the unique sectors where fewer Manchester residents worked or the foundational economy;

·                Should greater consideration be given to a more broader base of skills provision, such as digital skills;

·                How were employment opportunities within the foundation economy being taken into consideration as there was concern that these were not being taken into account as areas of employment that were of worthwhile employment;

·                There was concern that with the hollowing out of the intermediary economy, there would not be enough opportunities within those sectors identified as unique and an asset to the city, for those employed within the foundation economy who had aspirations of working in higher level knowledge based employment;

·                It was highlighted that the Government’s Apprenticeship Strategy had been an abject failure and many people had been let down by this scheme, as such was the Council lobbying for something less unwielding to the current Apprenticeship Levy;  ...  view the full minutes text for item 3.

4.

The City's Future Economy and Labour Market Requirements - CEIAG and Skills for Life pdf icon PDF 237 KB

Report of the Head of Work and Skills attached

 

This report provides an update on the developments of careers education, information, advice and guidance which have undergone a significant positive transformation over the last four years and now have a renewed emphasis nationally and investment in resources and infrastructure to improve careers programmes in secondary and post 16 provision.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Committee considered a report of the Head of Work and Skills, which highlighted the significant positive transformation Careers education, information, advice and guidance (CEIAG) had undergone over the last four years and provided an update on the developments, including and update on Skills for Life and how this was contributing towards preparing young people for future labour markets.

 

The Head of Work and Skills referred to the main points and themes in the report, which included:-

 

·                The national context for schools and colleges to secure independent careers guidance for all registered pupils at the school/college in years 8 to 3 on the full range of education and training options, including apprenticeships;

·                An overview of the Greater Manchester context and activity, including the prioradvisities of the Greater Manchester Careers and Participation Strategy;

·                The role and purpose of Enterprise Advisor Networks to work strategically with school leadership teams to guide and influence the development and implementation of an effective careers programme;

·                The work carried out by the GM Careers Hub and the CEIAG Network;

·                How the Council supported the most disadvantaged linking in with the work around transition and prevention of NEET;

·                The role of the Council’s Work and Skills Team in supporting employer’s engagement with schools and colleges to maximise the opportunities for young people; and

·                An update on Skills for Life (formally known as Curriculum for Life) in raising the profile of the transferable skills required by all employers so that children and young people understood the importance and relevance, especially in emerging sectors and changing labour market.

 

Some of the key points that arose from the Committees discussions were:-

 

·                It was suggested that it would be useful to compare how Manchester performed in encouraging quality provision of careers programmes with other core cities across the country;

·                It was queried that in the inevitability of a future recession, would the Council be able to request funding from Government to continue to provide CEIAG in Manchester

·                It was requested for more information on which schools were engaged with Inspiring IAG;

·                It was highlighted that by sharing quantative and qualitative information on young people’s learning goals and career ambitions between schools and Further Education (FE) providers would enable a smoother transition and maximise the support that could be offered;

·                With the removal the Careers Service in 2012, it was questioned as to how comprehensive was the support and careers guidance now offered to young people;

·                It was commented that due to the high number of SME’s within the city, it was difficult for young people to get a sense of the kind of work required within these businesses, as it was likely to be more diverse, which often required a different level of mental agility;

·                What was the evidence that showed that schools and colleges engaged with a Career Hub and the Enterprise Advisor Network provided a more effective CEIAG;

 

The Director of Education advised that the Gatsby Benchmark was a national benchmark and was not just associated to Manchester.  As  ...  view the full minutes text for item 4.

5.

Delivering the Our Manchester Strategy- Update from the Executive Member for Housing and Regeneration pdf icon PDF 248 KB

Report of the Executive Member for Housing and Regeneration

 

This report provides an overview of work undertaken and progress towards the delivery of the Council’s priorities as set out in the Our Manchester strategy for those areas within the portfolio of the Executive Member for Housing and Regeneration

 

Additional documents:

Minutes:

This item was deferred to the Committee’s meeting on 5 March 2020.

 

6.

Overview Report pdf icon PDF 319 KB

Report of the Governance and Scrutiny Support Unit attached

 

This report provides the Committee with details of key decisions that fall within the Committee’s remit and an update on actions resulting from the Committee’s recommendations. The report also includes the Committee’s work programme, which the Committee is asked to amend as appropriate and agree.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Committee considered a report of the Governance and Scrutiny Support Unit which contained key decisions within the Committee’s remit and responses to previous recommendations was submitted for comment. Members were also invited to agree the Committee’s future work programme. 

 

Decision

 

The Committee:-

 

(1)       Notes the report;

(2)       Agrees the Work Programme as submitted