Manchester City Council

Agenda and minutes

Agenda and minutes

Neighbourhoods and Environment Scrutiny Committee
Wednesday, 5th September, 2018 10.00 am

Venue: Council Chamber, Level 2, Town Hall Extension

Contact: Lee Walker 

Webcast: View the webcast

Items
No. Item

35.

Minutes pdf icon PDF 216 KB

To approve as a correct record the minutes of the meeting held on 18 July 2018.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Decision

 

To approve the minutes of the meeting held on 18 July 2018 as a correct record.

36.

Housing Issues pdf icon PDF 395 KB

Report of the Director of Housing and Residential Growth

 

The committee had asked for a “Housing” report to include the following themes:

 

          Progress on the Selective Licensing schemes (to include data on the number of evictions as a result)

          Manchester Move;

          Housing vulnerable people in B&Bs and how B&Bs are inspected;

          Tackling rogue landlords, and the Rental Charter;

          Social Housing and new builds across the city; and

          Northwards ALMO (arms-length management organisation).

 

This report has been produced collaboratively by officers from Neighbourhood Services (Selective Licensing and Rogue Landlords), Adult Services (Homelessness; Bed and Breakfast accommodation) and Strategic Housing (New house-building and Northwards Housing).

 

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Committee considered the report of the Director of Housing and Residential Growth which provided information on a range of housing related areas.

 

Officers referred to the main points and themes within the report which included:-

 

·                Progress on the Selective Licensing schemes and data on the number of evictions as a result of the introduction of these schemes;

·                Manchester Move, the name given to the single point of access and a common application process for social housing in Manchester;

·                Housing vulnerable people in B&Bs and how B&Bs are inspected;

·                Tackling rogue landlords, and the Rental Charter;

·                Social Housing and new builds across the city; and

·                Northwards ALMO (arms-length management organisation).

 

Some of the key points that arose from the Committee’s discussions were:-

 

·                Welcoming the positive impact Selective Licensing was having in those areas;

·                Welcoming the figures that had shown that evictions had not increased as a result of the introduction of Selective Licensing schemes;

·                Support for rolling out the Selective Licensing schemes and the Rogue Landlord Team to other areas of the city to address rouge landlords and poor property management and requested an analysis of the impact of these schemes;

·                Consideration needed to be given to the duty of rehousing for repeat perpetrators of  anti-social behaviour;

·                Why was the reported number of formal action taken against landlords low;

·                What were the minimum standard that Bed and Breakfasts had to adhere to, how often are they inspected and were there many complaints from tenants of these;

·                Following the regeneration of the Ben Street area of Clayton concern was raised over the reported lack of social housing being offered as part of this scheme;

·                Welcoming the partnership approach to delivering Social Housing and New Builds across the City; and

·                Would Section 106 funding secured from the developments within the city centre be ring fenced to fund affordable housing in the city centre.

 

The Strategic Lead Compliance, Enforcement and Community Safety said that Bed and Breakfasts that meet the requirements for Houses in Multiple Occupation (HMO) licensing (i.e. 3 or more stories, with 5 or more households sharing amenities such as kitchen and bathroom facilities) are included in the Housing Compliance and Enforcement team’s HMO Licensing programme.  They are granted a licence for a maximum of 2 years. An inspection takes place on receipt of an application with a further planned inspection to check compliance with the licence. A further unannounced inspection is carried out each year. They are subject to HMO standards. She said these are available on the Council’s website and would be circulated to Members for information. She agreed to circulate the numbers of inspections undertaken and informed Members that the number of complaints received from residents of B&Bs was very low which is why the additional unannounced inspection takes place.

 

With regard to the number of prosecutions of rogue landlords she said that formal enforcement would take place and further information on the figures reported in section 4.3 of the report would be provided to  ...  view the full minutes text for item 36.

37.

Update on the work to tackle homelessness and rough sleeping and the Manchester Homeless Strategy pdf icon PDF 286 KB

Report of the Strategic Lead for Homelessness

 

This report provides an update on the work that is taking place to tackle homelessness and rough sleeping in the City. It covers the impact on Manchester of the implementation of the Homelessness Reduction Act 2017; presents information on the work to tackle rough sleeping; and covers the impact of the Cold Weather Provision.

 

The report includes the new draft Strategy for Homelessness for the City of Manchester. This Strategy is currently under discussion and will be signed off by the Homeless Partnership in September, for launching on the 10 October, World Homeless Day. The report also includes the Council’s wider action plan for homelessness that will sit below the Strategy for comment.

 

 

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Committee considered the report of the Strategic Lead for Homelessness that provided an update on the work that was taking place to tackle homelessness and people sleeping rough sleeping in the City.

 

Officers referred to the main points and themes within the report which included:-

 

·                The impact on Manchester of the implementation of the Homelessness Reduction Act 2017;

·                Information on the work to tackle people who are sleeping rough;

·                The impact of the Cold Weather Provision;

·                The new draft Strategy for Homelessness for the City of Manchester that was currently under discussion and would be signed off by the Homeless Partnership in September, for launching on the 10 October, World Homeless Day; and

·                The Council’s wider action plan for homelessness that would sit below the Strategy.

 

Some of the key points that arose from the Committee’s discussions were:-

 

·                The appropriateness of placing families in temporary accommodation that extended for periods of up to two years and the impact that this had on children’s education and a families wider support network;

·                Whilst recognising the success of the Longford Centre what provision was there for homeless people with complex mental health and / or substance misuse issues;

·                A City Centre ward Member commented on the excellent work undertaken by the Council’s outreach workers with people sleeping rough and the partnership approach to address this issue;

·                What were the true numbers of people sleeping rough and how many were there outside of the city centre;

·                Members commented on the generous nature of Mancunians who gave money to people sleeping rough but questioned if this was enabling people to remain living on the streets and not helping alleviate the problem;

·                There was a clear distinction between street begging and people sleeping rough;

·                The impact of austerity and welfare reform on the levels of homelessness;

·                Domestic Violence was absent from the Manchester Homelessness Strategy;

·                How long were homeless people in B&B accommodation and concern was expressed regarding the condition of these properties;

·                How effective was the triage service provided to people who presented as homeless as there was anecdotal evidence of inappropriate service and solutions offered to families, often out of area; and

·                Were there any other places that people could present and be assessed rather than having to attend the Town Hall and wait for often long periods of time to be seen and assessed.

 

Councillor Karney, Member for Harpuhey ward addressed the Committee and said that his ward and the neighbouring ward of Moston were proud to offer support to homeless people but were disappointed to note that both wards had been identified within the report. He further called for additional resources for the wards to help support these residents who are housed in the area. The Deputy Leader apologised to the Member and commented that dispersed accommodation was provided across the city. She said that discussions were ongoing with Housing Providers to look at options for the management of these properties and offer floating support to tenants. She said  ...  view the full minutes text for item 37.

38.

Resident Parking Policy pdf icon PDF 236 KB

Report of the Operational Director of Highways

 

The purpose of this paper is to consider a new resident parking policy for Manchester. The policy, once approved, will enable the council to move forward in designing, costing and ultimately implementing a sustainable model for residents’ parking schemes across the city.

 

 

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Committee considered the report of the Operational Director of Highways that invited the Members to consider a new resident parking policy for Manchester. The policy, once approved, would enable the council to move forward in designing, costing and ultimately implementing a sustainable model for residents’ parking schemes across the city.

 

The report informed Members that it would be necessary to come back to a future meeting with detailed proposals including costs, how schemes would be funded and a proposed charging regime once further work on testing existing and potential new schemes against the policy principles had been undertaken.

 

Officers referred to the main points and themes within the report which included:-

 

·                A background to resident’s parking schemes since the introduction of these in the city almost 20 years ago;

·                Proposed Principles for Resident Parking Schemes;

·                Where schemes should be considered;

·                Financial consequences and the need for a clear plan for meeting revenue costs;

·                Visitor, carer’s and business permits and Blue Badge holders; and

·                Information on the proposal to review existing schemes.

 

The Committee heard from a resident of St Georges, Hulme who had been invited to address the Members to describe the experience of local residents. He informed the Committee:-

 

·                Residents experienced inconsiderate parking on their streets by people who use the streets as a car park;

·                Of daily incidents of cars being parked over dropped kerbs, parking on pavements and on double yellow lines;

·                Pedestrians were unable to use the pavements as a result of this inconsiderate parking,

·                It was not safe for wheel chair users and residents with a disability to use the pavements;

·                Bin collection and road sweepers had difficulty accessing the area due to the parking of cars, this had an impact on the cleanliness of the area;

·                Concerns had been expressed that in the event of a tragedy, emergency vehicles would be unable to access the area;

·                Section 106 funding from local building developments should be used to fund a local resident parking scheme; and

·                Residents of St Georges were calling for parity as other resident parking schemes existed in the Hulme area. 

 

Some of the key points that arose from the Committee’s discussions were:-

 

·                Acknowledging that the increase in car use and related parking issues was as a result of the success of the city;

·                Acknowledging that more schemes are desperately needed to tackle the blight of commuter parking particularly, but not exclusively in the area surrounding the city centre;

·                Acknowledging the financial pressures that new schemes will add to already existing revenue costs;

·                Discussions with local residents had highlighted that residents would not be willing to pay for schemes that already existed and had stated that these schemes should remain as they were. There were, however, areas highlighted where residents would be prepared to contribute towards the costs of a scheme;

·                Acknowledging the principle of tightening availability of residents visitor permits as they may be subject to abuse, but recognise the reality that residents are visited by multiple friends and visitors;  ...  view the full minutes text for item 38.

39.

Overview Report pdf icon PDF 304 KB

Report of the Governance and Scrutiny Support Unit

 

This report includes details of the key decisions due to be taken that are relevant to the Committee’s remit as well as an update on actions resulting from the Committee’s recommendations. The report also includes the Committee’s work programme, which the Committee is asked to agree.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The report of the Governance and Scrutiny Support Unit which contained key decisions within the Committee’s remit and responses to previous recommendations was submitted for comment. Members were also invited to agree the Committee’s future work programme.  

 

Decisions

 

The Committee notes the report and approve the work programme.