Agenda and draft minutes

Agenda and draft minutes

Executive - Wednesday, 17th March, 2021 2.00 pm

Venue: Virtual Meeting webcast at https://vimeo.com/519490615

Contact: Michael Williamson 

Items
No. Item

39.

Minutes pdf icon PDF 594 KB

To approve as a correct record the minutes of the meeting held on 17 February 2021.

Minutes:

Decision

 

To approve as a correct record the minutes of the meeting on 17 February 2021.

40.

COVID 19 Monthly Update Report pdf icon PDF 893 KB

Report of the Chief Executive attached

Minutes:

The Executive received a report of the Chief Executive which took the form of three “situation reports”, one each for the work on the city’s economic recovery, work with residents and communities, and work on the future of the Council itself.

 

At the meeting the Executive Member for Adult Services reflected that the city was almost one year on from the first lockdown and in Manchester, this sadly marked the painful milestone that 1000 Mancunians had lost their lives to COVID.  She commented that all members’ hearts where with someone who had lost someone close to them and had been impacted by the virus themselves.  She reported that the city would be taking part next week in the national day of reflection, which included the lighting up of Manchester library, a minutes silence at midday, participation in the national 8pm doorstep activity and also the creation of beacon memorials in cemeteries.  She added that after COVID the Council would work with residents to find a fitting way to remember all that had been lost over the course of the last year.

 

The Executive Member for Adult Services then reported on the following key points:-

 

·                The current rate of infection stood at stood 92.6 cases per 100,000, which was a slight increase, which could be attributed to the return of children to Primary and Secondary Schools;

·                The Prevalence rate in over 60’s continued to decline with a standing array of 57.6 cases per 100,000;

·                More Mancunians were being tested for COVID through PCR and lateral flow testing;

·                A refreshed Local Outbreak and Response Plan would be submitted to the next meeting of the Health and Wellbeing Bard, taking stock of the last year and the steps need to be taken in the city in light of the government road map with a view to slowly returning to normal; and

·                Over 161,000 Mancunians had had their first vaccination and over 6,000 had also had their second vaccination.

 

Following a question on the uptake of Lateral Flow testing in schools, the Executive Member for Children and Schools commented that this was an emerging picture as children had only just started to return to school.  However, data was being collected on the levels of consent across the city and this was showing a strong level amongst teaching staff and pupils.

 

The Public Health Manager reported that the introduction of regular Lateral Flow testing for secondary school pupils was a positive step for Public Health in order to identify cases early and isolate households early as part of Early Identification and Control programme across the city.

 

Decision

 

The Executive:-

 

(1)      Notes the report

(2)      Note the series of events planned in the city as part of the national day of Reflection on Tuesday 23 March 2021

41.

Spring Budget Statement and MCC Revenue Budget Impact pdf icon PDF 463 KB

Report of the Deputy Chief Executive and City Treasurer attached

Minutes:

The Executive received a report of the Deputy Chief Executive and City Solicitor, which summarised the announcements in the Chancellor’s Spring Budget Statement and considered the COVID-19 related funding that was likely to be available and any approvals and delegations that would be required.

 

The report detailed areas of temporary funding that was available to support Manchester residents, and calculated the impact of the support on the Manchester economy and where known, what the plans were for the year ahead for following areas-

 

·                The universal uplift of £20 to all recipients of Universal Credit

·                The universal uplift of £20 to all recipients of working tax credits;

·                The freezing of Local Housing Allowance rates in cash terms;

·                Funding for free school meals;

·                The removal of the Hardship payment to Local Authorities (to compensate for the reduction in Council Tax received due to the increase in numbers of those on Council Tax Support);

·                The Contain Outbreak Management Funding (COMF); and

·                The Test and Trace Support Payment Funding

 

The report also made proposals for additional support in key areas to support the city’s most vulnerable residents, which included:-

 

·                Additional support to working age residents in receipt of Council Tax Support towards the Council Tax that is due - based on a discretionary hardship award of various grant options of £50, £100 and £150;

·                Free School Meal provision – a proposal to use the relevant funding sources to provide three weeks of provision at a £15 per week award which would cover the Easter Break and the half term period;

·                Additional support to carers in the city -  a further grant scheme of £100,000;

·                Tackling Digital Exclusion - a proposal to invest further funding of £274,000 for the delivery of a digital inclusion activities linked to investment from Manchester Health and Community Care’s (MHCC) Digital Transformation Group (DTG) and the Community Champions programme; and

·                Temporary Absence outside Great Britain - Housing Benefit claims for people who were abroad and who would be absent from home for more than four weeks should be kept in payment until such time as they were able to return to their home, the cost to the Council was likely to be nil.

 

The estimated total cost of these initiatives was £6.2m.  It was proposed this was funded from the uncommitted COMF funding for 2020/21 of £10.3m, leaving a balance of c£4.1m available to support additional resource planning requirements in the remainder of 2020/21 and in 2021/22.

 

In addition, the Spring Budget had announced additional support for local businesses, centred around Business Rates Grants, Business Rates reliefs and discounts and Expanded Retail Discount and Nurseries’ Discounts for 2021/22.  The report therefore sought further delegations for the additional business support funding to administer these Government schemes.

 

Furthermore, the report provided details of the Breathing Space initiative that would be introduced in May 2021.  This scheme provided for a breathing space moratorium and a mental health crisis moratorium.  This would provide protections for people in problem debt by pausing enforcement action from  ...  view the full minutes text for item 41.

42.

Capital Programme Update Report pdf icon PDF 252 KB

Report of the Deputy Chief Executive and City Treasurer attached

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Executive considered a report of the Deputy Chief Executive and City Treasurer, which report informed Members of requests to increase the capital programme, sought approval for those schemes that could be approved under authority delegated to the Executive and requested the Executive to recommend to Council proposals that required specific Council approval

 

The proposals which required Council approval were those which were funded by the use of reserves above a cumulative total of £2million, where the use of borrowing was required or a virement exceeded £0.500m. These included the following proposed changes:-

 

·                Chorlton Library Refurbishment – a capital budget increase of £0.600m in 2021/22 funded by borrowing, and a capital budget virement in 2021/22 of £0.105m, funded by Open Libraries Project was requested to provide significant repair and maintenance as identified by a recent condition survey;

·                Campfield Redevelopment Acquisition of Castlefield House – a capital budget virement of £3.735m in 2021/22 was requested, funded by Sustaining Key Initiatives budget in order to facilitate the redevelopment of Campfield Yard;

·                Hammerstone Road – . A capital budget increase of £4.969m in 2022/23 was requested, funded by borrowing to deliver key changes identified by stakeholders, additional design developments and support to Biffa remaining operational on the site whilst works take place

·                Accident Reduction and Local Community Safety Schemes – a capital budget virement of £2m in 2021/22 was requested, funded by Other Improvement Works budget to deliver an improved road safety at multiple locations across the city

 

The report then went on to detail the proposals that did not require Council approval which were funded by the use of external resources, use of capital receipts, use of reserves below £2millio, where the proposal could be funded from existing revenue budgets or where the use of borrowing on a spend to save basis was required.  These included:-

 

·                Wythenshawe Cycling Hub – A capital budget increase of £0.500m in 2021/22 was requested, funded by External Contribution, and a capital budget virement of £0.599m in 2021/22 was requested, funded by Parks Development Programme in order to develop the City’s first Cycling Hub Facility at Wythenshawe Park, address the inactivity levels in South Manchester and support people within the catchment area to access cycling in a traffic free environment within 15 minutes from where people live;

·                Off Street Parking Priority Works – . A capital budget increase of £0.606m in 2021/22 was requested, funded by Capital Receipts for priority works that should be undertaken in the first 12 months of the car parks being run in house;

·                Carbon Reduction Programme – a capital budget increase of £1.323m in 2021/22 was requested, funded by External Contribution to  

·                to support the delivery of a large Solar Car Port installation at the National Cycling Centre and a large rooftop Solar PV plus battery storage installation at the Council’s Hammerstone Road Depot;

·                Schools Capital Maintenance Programme – a capital budget increase of £1.287m in 2021/22 was requested, funded by Government Grant to be used to address condition needs identified in  ...  view the full minutes text for item 42.

43.

Manchester City Council Climate Change Action Plan 2020-25 pdf icon PDF 478 KB

Report of the Deputy Chief Executive and City Treasurer attached

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Executive received a report from the Deputy Chief Executive and City Treasurer, which provided an update on the significant progress that had been made in delivering the Plan over the last 10 months despite the challenges posed by the COVID-19 pandemic. .

 

The Council’s Climate Change Action Plan 2020/25 set an ambition for the Council to reduce its direct CO2 emissions by 50% between 2020 and 2025 based on a 13% year on year reduction trajectory. The Plan also recognised the Council’s unique leadership role in supporting and influencing the city to reduce its emissions and in ensuring that the city’s residents were protected from the impacts of climate change.

 

Since declaring a Climate Emergency, the Council had set about transforming the way it worked to ensure that climate change was at the heart of the organisation and its work with partners, residents and with its young people. The Council’s Corporate Plan priorities had been refreshed for 2020/21 to reflect the city’s zero carbon ambitions, resulting in the inclusion of a new ‘Zero Carbon Manchester’ priority.  Policies, procedures and decision making had also been reviewed as well as work within procurement and commissioning, changes to the Capital Gateway approval process and the development of a new Manchester Low Carbon Build Standard.

 

The table below summarised the main actions that would deliver the 50% reduction in the Council’s direct CO2 emissions between 2020 and 2025.

 

Direct Emissions Action 2020-25 

Annual Carbon Saving (tonnes CO2) 

Completion of Phase 1 Buildings Carbon Reduction Programme  

1,400 

Completion of Phase 1 (a) Buildings Carbon Reduction Programme - ERDF Supported  

400 

Phase 2 of Carbon Reduction Programme  

3,000 

Large scale energy generation scheme 

7,000 

Completion of the final year of the street lighting LED replacement programme 

220 

Estimated carbon emissions saving benefit from the decarbonisation of the National Grid  

800 

Completion of the Civic Quarter Heat Network and connection to the Town Hall, Town Hall Extension, Art Gallery and Central Library  

1,600 

Replacement of half of waste fleet vehicles with Electric Vehicles 

900 

Reductions to the Council’s Fleet through increase in number of Electric Vehicles 

400 

Reduction in staff travel via car, taxi, air, train 

100 

Total Estimated Savings 

15,820 

 

It was reported that the Council’s direct CO2 emissions had reduced by 54.7% between 2009/10 and 2019/20.  The report then went on to provide a summary of the main areas of progress against the five sections of the Plan along with any challenges or delays.  An analysis of additional financial investment against each of the actions in the Plan had also been undertaken and the total investment figure was £92.5m which was made up of £89.2m of capital investment and £3.3m of revenue investment. The breakdown of this by funder was as follows:-

 

·                £23.5m Council funding;

·                £32.9m funding from UK Government;

·                £4.9m funding from the European Union;

·                £25.7m funding from Greater Manchester Combined Authority projects; and

·                £1.1m funding secured by the Manchester Climate Change Agency for community projects.

 

The activity delivered since March  ...  view the full minutes text for item 43.

44.

Places for Everyone - A Proposed Joint Development Plan Document of Nine GM Districts pdf icon PDF 245 KB

Report of the Director of Planning, Building Control and Licensing and  Director of City Centre Growth and Infrastructure attached

Minutes:

The Executive considered a report of the Director of Planning, Building Control and Licensing and Director of City Centre Growth and Infrastructure, which set out a proposal for a Joint Development Plan Document (DPD) of Nine Greater Manchester Local Authorities.

 

Up until December 2020 a joint development plan document of the ten Greater Manchester local authorities was being prepared, Greater Manchester’s Plan for Jobs, Homes & the Environment (known as the “GMSF”). However, the decision at Stockport Council’s meeting on 3 December 2020 to not submit the GMSF 2020 following the consultation period and the subsequent resolution at its Cabinet meeting on 4 December not to publish the GMSF 2020 for consultation in effect signalled the end of the GMSF as a joint plan of the 10.  Consequently, at its meeting on the 11 December 2020, Members of the AGMA Executive Committee asked for a report to be drafted on the implications and process of producing a joint Development Plan Document of the nine remaining Greater Manchester (GM) districts.

 

The preparation of the former GMSF was undertaken by the AGMA Executive Board on behalf of the ten GM authorities. The withdrawal of Stockport Council from that process in December 2020 meant that it was no longer appropriate for the AGMA Executive Board to continue with the oversight of the new plan.  It therefore required a new joint committee to be established consisting of the remaining nine local authorities (Manchester, Bolton, Bury, Oldham, Rochdale, Salford, Tameside, Trafford and Wigan).

 

The purpose of the Joint Committee would be to formulate and prepare the joint DPD.  In the event that the draft joint DPD was considered to have substantially the same effect on the nine districts as the GMSF 2020, the next stage would be a consultation on a publication version of the joint DPD

 

The AGMA report highlighted that membership of the joint committee was a

matter for individual local authorities to determine. However, it was suggested, for  continuity purposes, that Leaders from each of the nine local authorities formed the membership of the committee, with the ability for a nominated deputy to attend as necessary. It would also be the responsibility of the joint committee to agree its terms of reference and the operational arrangements, including the appointing of the chair and the voting arrangements. 

 

The report explained that once the joint committee was established, there would be a need to update Manchester’s Local Development Scheme (LDS) which previously set out the timetable for the production of the GMSF alongside next steps for the Council’s emerging Local Plan. The LDS would be updated at the appropriate time in advance of the next round of consultation on the new joint DPD – Places for Everyone.

 

Furthermore, it was clarified that the function of scrutiny in the production of the joint DPD would remain with the individual districts as the relevant decisions will rest with the districts, not AGMA or the GMCA.

 

Decisions

 

The Executive:-

 

(1)      Approve the making of an agreement with the  ...  view the full minutes text for item 44.

45.

City Centre Transport Strategy to 2040 pdf icon PDF 331 KB

Report of the Director of City Centre Growth and Infrastructure attached

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Committee considered a report of the Director of City Centre Growth and Infrastructure, which sought endorsement of the final City Centre Transport (CCTS) 2040.

 

The revised CCTS responds to comprehensive engagement with local residents, businesses and organisations over the last two years.  Given the high level of support received from the consultation for the overall strategy, the vision for the revised CCTS remained for “a well-connected, zero carbon city centre at the heart of the North, offering our residents, employees and visitors a great place to work, live and visit”.  Similarly the central aim for 90% of all trips to the city centre to be made by foot (including people using wheelchairs, mobility scooters and with guide dogs), by cycle or using public transport by 2040 in the morning peak remained, as did the seven core ambitions, which were:

 

·                Walking (including people using wheelchairs and mobility scooters) is the main way of getting around the city centre

·                The city centre is cleaner and less congested

·                More people choose to cycle to destinations within the city centre

·                The city centre benefits from better public transport connections

·                Parking in the city centre is smarter and integrated with other modes

·                Goods are moved and delivered sustainably and efficiently into and within the city centre

·                Innovation is embraced where it benefits the city centre and its users.

 

The final CCTS provided the framework for key transport policies and interventions for future delivery, in both the shorter and longer term, leading up to 2040, covering all modes of transport used to move to, from and around the city centre.  It was proposed that the final strategy would be published following consideration by the Executive, Salford City Council and the Greater Manchester Combined Authority, which would be completed by the end of March. The final CCTS would be made available on the Council’s website, as well as those of TfGM and Salford Council. It would be used to guide transport and connectivity improvements to and within the city centre, in line with the overall 2040 Strategy.

 

Ongoing engagement on specific proposals would be carried out as they developed, including with residents, bus operators and users, businesses, transport forums, and other stakeholders.

 

Following a comment in relation the bus proposals within the city centre and discussions around future franchising, the Leader advised that in terms of bus franchising there was an incoherent system at present and whist there was fierce opposition to franchising from some bus operators, it was felt that this was the only way to deliver on the Council’s City Centre Transport Strategy.

 

Decisions

 

The Executive:-

 

(1)      Note the changes to the draft CCTS following the consultation;

 

(2)      Agree the final CCTS document for publication, noting that the strategy is also subject to approval from Salford City Council and the Greater Manchester Combined Authority and could be subject to minor amendments during this process; and 

 

(3)      Delegate responsibility to the Director of City Centre Growth and Infrastructure, in discussion with officers from Salford City  ...  view the full minutes text for item 45.

46.

North Manchester Health Campus Strategic Regeneration Framework consultation outcome pdf icon PDF 454 KB

Report of the Strategic Director – Growth and Development attached

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Executive received a report of the Strategic Director – Growth and Development, which detailed the outcome of the public consultation exercise carried out with local residents, businesses, landowners and key stakeholders, on the draft Strategic Regeneration Framework (SRF) for the North Manchester Health Campus.  The report responded to the issues raised and sought endorsement and approval of the final SRF.

 

The intention was to transform the existing North Manchester General Hospital site into a modern Health Campus providing high quality hospital and health facilities in addition to providing complementary commercial, leisure and retail uses set within a high quality, greener public realm and a residential offer which was best in class in terms of healthy ageing.

 

The consultation demonstrated a considerable positive response to the proposals, with people in general expressing support for the vision as set out in the draft SRF. Throughout this process respondents highlighted a number of key points which had been considered as part of the finalisation of the SRF document.  Of those that responded to the public consultation, there was considerable support for the SRF vision with 86% of the respondents supporting the plans to transform the site at North Manchester General Hospital.

 

It was noted that the benefits that could be secured for North Manchester and the wider city and city region, as a result of the proposals set out in the draft SRF, could make a significant positive contribution to the ongoing regeneration and transformation of North Manchester; environmentally, socially and economically.

 

Decisions

 

The Executive:-

 

(1)       Note the comments received on the draft SRF and the response to these comments.

 

(2)       Note the changes made to the SRF.

 

(3)       Approve the North Manchester Health Campus SRF with the intention that it will become a material consideration in the Council’s decision-making process as Local Planning Authority. 

47.

Wythenshawe Hospital Campus Strategic Regeneration Framework pdf icon PDF 343 KB

Report of the Strategic Director – Growth and Development attached

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Executive considered a report of the Strategic Director – Growth and Development, which set out a proposed Strategic Regeneration Framework for the Wythenshawe Hospital Campus . The report also detailed the outcome of a public consultation exercise with local residents, businesses and stakeholders.

 

The Framework envisaged the development of the Wythenshawe Hospital Campus and its environs as a sustainable health village over a 10 to 15 year period enhancing the Hospital whilst diversifying uses to include complementary commercial, leisure and retail set within a high quality, greener public realm.

 

Within the context of the existing Core Strategy planning policy for Manchester, the Wythenshawe Hospital Campus represented a significant new opportunity to contribute towards the economic, social, environmental and health priorities for Greater Manchester, building on its significant advantages and future planning in respect of strategic transport connections and the wider sphere of influence. 

 

The consultation process engaged as wide an audience as possible whilst complying with COVID social distancing regulations, which incorporated a range of methods, including the distribution of 7000 letters to neighbouring properties, leaflets and video briefing sessions, as well as use of traditional and social media.  MFT also ran two Twitter polls in respect of the proposals, in order to seek additional feedback alongside a questionnaire.

 

From the broad twitter poll, responded by 647 people, the vast majority (87%) were in support of the proposals.  With regard to the questionnaire, respondents were asked to provide comments in relation to the key themes as summarised below, which were detailed in the report:-

 

·                Enhancing the quality of health care facilities;

·                Creating a welcome environment for all users, including accessible green space;

·                Improved accessibility by foot, cycle and public transport;

·                Expanding the type of land use, including complementary development that creates employment, key worker housing and step-down care facilities;

·                Creating a sustainable health campus, which delivers on the Hospital Trust’s commitment to be net Zero Carbon by 2038; and

·                Other considerations in relation to maximising benefits to local communities.

 

The responses to the consultation had identified strong support for the Wythenshawe Hospital Campus Strategic Regeneration Framework. Where comments had been made in relation to the above themes, these had been carefully considered and where appropriate modifications had been made to the Framework.  It was notes that the key objectives of the Framework and proposals remained the same as those supported by the Executive at its meeting on the 11 March 2020.    

 

Decisions

 

The Executive:-

 

(1)      Note and comment on the outcome of the public consultation on the draft Wythenshawe Hospital Campus Strategic Regeneration Framework.

 

(2)      Approve the Wythenshawe Hospital Campus Strategic Regeneration Framework and request that Planning and Highways Committee take the Framework into account as a material consideration when considering planning applications for the area.

 

48.

Withington Village Framework Update pdf icon PDF 334 KB

Report of the Strategic Director – Growth and Development attached

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Executive received a report of the Strategic Director – Growth and Development, which detailed the outcome of a public consultation exercise with local residents, businesses and stakeholders, on the draft Withington Village Framework and sought approval of the Framework.

 

Withington Village was a key District Centre in south Manchester which served the Withington and Old Moat population, providing a hub for the community and a range of services.  The draft Framework identified a vision for the Village as a liveable place that met the needs of its diverse community.  It built on its cultural, physical and heritage assets and sought to develop these further.  New public spaces were proposed along with an improved street environment and movement for pedestrians and cyclists;

 

Due to COVID restrictions being in place, a range of methods were put in place to allow respondents to have their say on the draft Framework.  The Council received a strong response with a total of 200 responses, 189 of which were submitted via the Council’s consultation web page, 10 via email and one written response. The overwhelming majority of the 189 online respondents were supportive of the framework proposals. Similarly, email and written responses showed a high level of support for the framework and the proposals contained within.

 

Responses were received from statutory consultees in relation to the key themes as summarised below, which were detailed in the report:-

 

·                Movement in and around the village;

·                Public Space;

·                Heritage and Streetscape; and

·                Governance Arrangements.

 

Responses were also received from Community Groups, including Withington Village Residents Partnership (WVRP), Withington Civic Society and Love Withington Baths.  All groups firmly supported the objectives of the Framework including aspirations to improve the general environment of the Village in favour of walking/cycling, create high quality public spaces, increase public art, improve conservation area shop fronts, establish a formal shop front design guide, identify residential development opportunities and enhance links to The Christie, Withington Baths and local parks.

 

The Executive also considered comments from Councillor Wills, Ward Councillor for Withington and Councillor White, Ward Councillor for Old Moat, who both spoke in support of the Framework.

 

Subject to approval of the Framework, the next steps were to discuss with WVRP and local Councillors in Withington and Old Moat the development of governance arrangements to ensure that the community were consulted and communicated with as the Framework proposals were developed and implemented.

 

 

Decisions

 

The Executive:-

 

(1)     Note and comment on the outcome of the public consultation on the draft Withington Village Framework.

 

(2)     Approve the Withington Village Framework and request that Planning and Highways Committee take the framework update into account as a material consideration when considering planning applications for the area.

 

 

 

49.

Ardwick Green - Neighbourhood Development Framework pdf icon PDF 681 KB

Report of the Strategic Director – Growth and Development attached

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Executive considered a report of the Strategic Director – Growth and Development, which detailed the outcome of a public consultation exercise involving local residents, businesses and stakeholders, relating to a Draft Neighbourhood Development Framework (NDF) for the Ardwick Green area and sought approval of a final version of the NDF.

 

The Ardwick Green neighbourhood was located on the south-eastern edge of the city centre and was increasingly attracting the attention of developers and investors. The development of a Neighbourhood Development Framework (NDF) would guide and co-ordinate the future development of this key area, in line with adopted planning policy and build on existing regeneration initiatives in Mayfield and Brunswick.

 

The aspiration was to see improved social, environmental and economic outcomes from well-designed developments in the local context and a sense of place.  The NDF included detailed and targeted objectives that could improve the liveability, functionality, design and connectivity of Ardwick Green.

 

Letters were sent to 1,920 local residents, landowners, businesses, and stakeholders, in late November 2020 informing them about the public consultation.  The Council received 25 responses to the public consultation. 21 responses were made via the consultation web pages on the City Council website and a further 4 were received by email from the Environment Agency, CBRE representing a landowner, Manchester and Salford Ramblers and the Medlock Primary School. 

 

The majority of the stakeholders who responded to the consultation expressed their overall support for the draft NDF, believing that appropriate development and preservation of the heritage aspects of the neighbourhood and the green spaces would enhance the neighbourhood. Responses to specific points raised had been considered within the report and a number of minor revisions had been made to the NDF document which were detail din the report.

 

Subject to endorsement of the Ardwick Green NDF, there were a number of important next steps for the  Council and project partners, including One Manchester, that needed to take place to ascertain the best way of implementing the ambitions of the Ardwick Green NDF, which included:-

 

·                Undertaking further technical work to devise a strategy for the management of residential and commuter parking that is currently adversely affecting the area;

·                Undertaking an audit of the existing social and affordable housing stock to identify the ways in which improvements could be delivered;

·                Supporting the opportunities presented and allow key stakeholders to carry out further detailed design and feasibility work on the potential form and function of the crossing points that could be included both within and to adjoining areas to improve connectivity; and

·                Taking steps to support community projects that could help to deliver immediate positive change in the local area and public spaces.

 

It was  noted that during the period of NDF development and consultation the Council became aware of the emergence of a new driver for change in the immediate area of the NDF, namely that the Manchester College had undertaken a review of its educational estate within the city and identified the Nicholl’s College Campus on Hyde Road /  ...  view the full minutes text for item 49.

50.

The Council Future Shape/Transformation programme pdf icon PDF 430 KB

Report of the Deputy Chief Executive and City Treasurer attached

Minutes:

The Executive received a report of the Deputy Chief Executive and City Treasurer, which set out the context and background for the Future Shape of the Council Programme, its priority areas of work and benefits to the Council and its residents.

 

The future shape of the Council programme would reshape how Manchester delivered services both internally and externally, by using new technologies, ways of working and new delivery models. It was an organisational wide initiative bringing together a number of programmes designed to strengthen our ability to deliver the Our Manchester Strategy and in doing so, creating a city where people want to live and work.

 

The scale of change required to overcome the upcoming challenges that the council faced meant a new council wide shape and approach was required. The programme would lead to a better Council and would ultimately improve outcomes for residents and staff, improve the Council’s long-term resilience and provide a framework for any future budget savings.

 

The priorities as articulated through the Future Shape programme enabled the delivery of required financial savings in a sustainable way whilst meeting the needs of communities and improving outcomes. A savings programme of £41m has been proposed for 2021/22 with those savings that were relevant to this programme mapped against the workstream areas.

 

 

As ell as changes within the Council, in July 2020, an independent report was commissioned to consider the next steps towards integrated health, care and enhanced well-being in the City of Manchester. The report made a number of recommendations as to how the MLCO could be ‘supercharged’ to become the platform for health, well-being and locally delivered integrated care. This alongside the recent Integrated Care White Paper, would require changes to how health and social care services were commissioned and delivered and the report set out the next steps of this work.

 

Decisions

 

The Executive:-

 

(1)      Endorse the approach to the Future Shape of the Council Programme.

(2)      Note the work to support the integration of health and social care in Manchester and that a further report will be brought back to the next Executive for the approval of the underpinning changes to the legal partnership agreements

51.

Refresh of the Council's Social Value Policy and what Social Value has been derived during Covid-19 lockdown pdf icon PDF 455 KB

Report of the Deputy Chief Executive and City Treasurer attached

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Executive considered a report of the Deputy Chief Executive and City Treasurer, which provided an update on the effects on the delivery of Social Value by the Council’s suppliers resulting from the pandemic and set out proposals to reprofile the Council’s priorities for the delivery of Social Value to more closely align the social value priorities to supporting the city’s economic recovery and introduce further measures that would ensure that the commitment to addressing the climate crisis was reflected by the Council’s suppliers.

 

Since 2015 the Council had applied a minimum 20% weighting to social value when evaluating tenders for council contracts. At the time, and to the present day this was the highest weighting for social value in the country.  The Council has also introduced a range of measures within our own organisation to promote social value and ethical employment and whilst the Council’s approach to including social value in tenders had been exemplary, there was an ongoing need to ensure that the delivery of social value took place throughout the contract.

 

It had been recognised that Social value has become even more of a priority in light of the coronavirus pandemic and the economic and social impacts it had had on Manchester and had a more important role than ever in supporting an inclusive, green economic recovery in Manchester.

 

In light of the developments over the last year, the Council’s zero carbon ambition and the Council’s ongoing experience in relation to delivery of social value, officers had drafted an updated social value policy. Specifically, the policy:-

 

·                Prioritised actions to support Manchester’s recovery

·                Expanded the priority groups for social value to reflect groups disproportionally impacted by the pandemic.

·                Added an additional dedicated social value weighting of 10% to support the zero carbon ambition in the evaluation of tenders.

 

The policy was also consistent with the recently refreshed Greater Manchester Combined Authority social value framework, which sets out high level principles focused around rebuilding our economy and society following the crisis caused by Covid-19 and as well as the policy document, new toolkits for suppliers and commissioners, contract staff and wider stakeholders were also being developed to reflect the updated policy.

 

Overall, it was felt that these changes would help to deliver more specific, measurable commitments from suppliers both in relation to the economic recovery and in relation to climate change and a strengthened focus on priority groups

 

Noting the comments that had been made by the Resources and Governance Scrutiny Committee in relation to the proposals, the following amendments to the Policy were proposed :-

 

·                The addition of the following to 'Why are we doing

 

·                Maximise use of local supply chains, retaining money in the Manchester economy – Support and strengthen organisations that make a positive?contribution to Manchester and retain money in the local?economy, including through use of local, Manchester-based supply chains.

 

·                The addition of the following Priority Actions:

 

·                Ensure ‘good employment’ is centre to?any?opportunities – We particularly encourage organisations to commit to the  ...  view the full minutes text for item 51.

52.

Young Manchester Review pdf icon PDF 270 KB

Report of the Strategic Director – Neighbourhoods attached

Minutes:

The Executive received a report of the Strategic Director – Neighbourhoods, which provided a summary of the Young Manchester review which was undertaken during December 2020 to February 2021. The report set out the findings from the review, considered the response and proposed several actions to build stronger and more effective arrangements going forward to improve the outcomes for children and young people.

 

Young Manchester was a charity that strived to improve opportunities for all children and young people across Manchester. Young Manchester aimed to provide children and young people across the city with increased opportunities in all aspects of their life by commissioning projects that responded to their ever-changing needs.

 

The Council’s grant agreement with Young Manchester had been live for the period; 1 July 2017 - 31 March 2021.  Young Manchester performed well in its first year to secure additional funding of £2.4m for play and youth work. However, it had not sustained this level of charitable funding and had struggled to attract new funding from local businesses. The Council had not seen the sustained financial returns it had envisaged through the creation of a Charitable Incorporated Organisation nor had the Council, given the high level of investment provided, been able to influence sufficiently Young Manchester’s work and priorities in the way this was anticipated.

 

It was clear from the review and the work undertaken on reviewing other delivery models, that leveraging additional external funding was unlikely to be substantially enhanced in the short to medium term by continuing to direct resources through a charitable arrangement.

 

Officers had examined whether the benefits of the existing arrangements outweighed the loss of influence over the deployment of the Council’s resources and the outcomes that resulted from the Council’s investment. The outcome of this work had led Officers to conclude the additional financial benefits of routing the Council’s investment through a charitable vehicle would be limited over the next 2-3 years and that the lack of control and influence over the work of the Charity put the Council at risk of not delivering the outcomes set out in the strategy and the requirement to build a meaningful youth offer. Given the contribution the Council was making to maintaining the existing arrangements, the lack of direct control and influence and the examples of not making enough meaningful progress against the outcomes, it was proposed that the delivery arrangements should be revisited.

 

As such, an alternative delivery model was proposed to be designed and developed, which sought to:

 

·                Build on the strengths and progress made by Young Manchester;

·                Accelerate the achievement of the outcomes set out in the Youth Strategy;

·                Reduce operational overheads and remove duplication to ensure more funding reaches grassroot organisations who were working directly with children and young people;

·                Ensure a citywide youth advisory board worked alongside the current Neighbourhood based youth partnerships to provide the sector with a stronger voice which advised the Council and informed commissioning practices, therefore increasing engagement from across the sector;

·                Placed data and  ...  view the full minutes text for item 52.

53.

The Manchester Civic Quarter Heat Network pdf icon PDF 317 KB

Report of the Strategic Director – Growth and Development attached

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Executive considered a report of the Strategic Director – Growth and Development, which provided an update to Members on the progress that had been made to date in respect of the Civic Quarter Heat Network (CQHN) project and next steps  It also provided a position statement on the ongoing external assurance work that was to be completed before the project moved into the operational phase.

 

The energy centre and pipework was scheduled to be completed in January 2021, however, there had been a number of delays to various elements of the project due to the impact of COVID and delays within the supply chain for specific elements of the project.

 

The contractual responsibility for the delivery of the gas connection rested with Vital Energi and their sub-contractor, Energy Assets Utilities (EAU) who were an experienced contractor delivering gas, electricity, and water networks in the UK’s public and private sectors.  Once all of the outstanding issues had been resolved the final connections to the buildings could be completed. 

 

The current approved budget for the project was £24m. In addition to this there was also a further £2m capital budget approved to provide additional capacity in the form of a second engine, if there was enough demand.  Any drawdown of the additional funding would be subject to a further business case.         It was currently forecasted that the project would be within budget. 

 

The report provided an overview of the elements associated with the build of the CQHN:-

 

·                Operational Phase - Financial Modelling (including Working Capital, Due Diligence, Risk and Mitigation);

·                Legal Assurance;

·                Structure and Governance; and

·                Business Plan

 

It was reported that both the confirmation of the final budget position (once the position in relation to the gas connection was resolved) and the final business plan would be presented to Executive in June 2021, following completion of the external assurance exercise by EY and approval by the Commercial Board.

 

Following a question on whether the possibility of introducing ground source heat pump cost had been accounted for in the overall budget, the Director – Commercial and operations advised that the cost of the heat pumps had not been included in the overall cost of the project.  There was potential government grant funding for these, but if this was not available it would be considered in the context of the  revenues being generated from the project.  This would be picked up in more detail in the Business Plan.

 

Decisions

 

The Executive:-

 

(1)      Note the progress that has been made to date.

 

(2)      Note that the final Business Plan associated for the project is to be presented to Executive in June 2021 for approval.

 

(3)      Endorse the previously agreed delegated authority to the Strategic Director (Development), the Deputy Chief Executive and City Treasurer, and the City Solicitor, in consultation with the Leader, Executive Member for the Environment and the Executive Member for Finance and Human Resources, to negotiate and finalise the terms of any remaining contractual and property arrangements necessary to give effect  ...  view the full minutes text for item 53.