Manchester City Council

Agenda and minutes

Agenda and minutes

Virtual, Executive - Friday, 3rd July, 2020 2.00 pm

Venue: Virtual Meeting - Webcast at https://manchester.public-i.tv/core/portal/webcast_interactive/485346

Contact: Donald Connolly 

Media

Items
No. Item

70.

Minutes pdf icon PDF 367 KB

To approve as a correct record the minutes of the meeting held on 6 June 2020 were to follow and are now enclosed.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The minutes of the meeting of the Executive on 3 June 2020 were approved as a correct record.

 

 

71.

COVID-19 Monthly Update Report pdf icon PDF 639 KB

The report of the Chief Executive was to follow and is now enclosed.

 

An addendum has now been added to this report

Addendum - Manchester COVID-19 Economic Recovery: Shovel Ready Projects with a link to download a spreadsheet with details of all the projects.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The monthly report on the work in Manchester to control the COVID-19 pandemic and help the city recover from the effects and impacts of the virus was considered. It explained that as of 29 June 2020, there were 1,740 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Manchester, a rate of 317.7 per 100,000 population. To date, there had been 383 registered deaths of Manchester residents involving COVID-19 (based on deaths occurring up to 12 June and registered up to 20 June). Of these, 76 deaths (19.8%) occurred in a care home. The infection rate and the number of deaths involving COVID-19 in Manchester was continuing to fall, from a peak of 80 deaths occurring in the week ending 17 April to just 9 deaths in the week ending 12 June.

 

The report and information given at the meeting explained the significant developments in the Test and Trace programme and the development of the Council’s Local Prevention and Response Plan. An update was provided on the planning for the full reopening of schools in the city at the start of the new school year in September 2020. The support for the homeless was continuing but the ‘Everyone In’ money that the Government had been provided had now stopped. The help and support being provided to businesses in the city, in particular the hospitality businesses, to help them reopen with appropriate social-distancing arrangements was also outlined.

 

The report also summarised the on-going impact of the pandemic on the Council’s own finances, both from a loss of income and from significant additional costs. The steps being taken to mitigate the worst of the financial effects were described.

 

An addendum to the report explained that on 30 June, the Prime Minister had announced a £900m fund for ‘shovel ready’ local growth projects in England, which could include regeneration, investment in transport, digital connectivity or technology centres to build on local advantage. The addendum set out a list of Manchester’s priority shovel ready projects, which could help ensure that the city plays its full part in the national economic recovery. The shovel ready projects identified in the list were the top priority schemes for the city over the next five years, those that had the greatest ability to contribute significantly to the city region’s recovery.

 

 

72.

St Mary's Parsonage - Strategic Regeneration Framework pdf icon PDF 508 KB

The report of the Strategic Director - Growth & Development is enclosed.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

In February 2020 the Executive had approved in principle a draft St Mary’s Parsonage Strategic Regeneration Framework (SRF) and requested that there should be public consultation on that draft (Minute Exe/20/27). A report submitted by the Strategic Director, Growth and Development presented the outcome of the consultation. The report proposed that a revised and final version of the Framework now be approved.

 

An extended period of consultation had run from 13 March 2020 to 22 May 2020. Consultation letters had been sent out to 1,172 local residents, landowners, businesses, and stakeholders, informing them about the public consultation, and how to engage in the process. The SRF was also made available on the Council’s website. There had been 20 responses made:

·         one response from a landowner;

·         a joint response from the Deansgate Ward Councillors;

·         one response from a resident management company;

·         three responses from statutory stakeholders; and

·         fourteen responses from local residents.

 

The report analysed in detail the responses of the consultees and the issues that they had raised under eight headings:

·         highways and traffic management

·         public realm and streetscape

·         architecture, development heights and density

·         water management

·         waste management and street cleansing

·         development uses

·         sustainability

·         the SRF itself and the consultation arrangements

 

The proposed responses to those issues were explained in the report along with the changes that had been made to the draft SRF to accommodate and take into consideration the consultees responses.

 

Having considered the responses to the consultation, and the changes made to the document as a result of those, it was agreed that that revised version of the SRF be approved.

 

Decisions

 

1.         To note the outcome of the public consultation on the draft SRF for the St Mary’s Parsonage area, and subsequent suggested revisions to the draft SRF.

 

2.         To approve the Strategic Regeneration Framework for the St Mary’s Parsonage area and request that Planning and Highways Committee take the framework into account as a material consideration when considering planning applications for the area.

 

 

73.

NOMA Strategic Regeneration Framework Update 2020 pdf icon PDF 519 KB

The report of the Strategic Director - Growth & Development is enclosed.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The NOMA estate extends for approximately 8 hectares and is a key regeneration priority in the city centre. It is bounded to the west by Corporation Street, to the north by Angel Street and Angel Meadows, to the east by Rochdale Road and by the Metrolink line from Victoria Station and the Shudehill Interchange to the south. It is located between Victoria Station and the Northern Quarter and adjacent to the city’s retail core.

 

In July 2009, the Executive had endorsed the Co-operative Group’s Strategic Regeneration Framework which set out a vision to create a commercially-led, mixed-use destination at the northern gateway to the city centre (Minute Exe/09/82). It was then envisaged that this would support the creation of an additional 15,000 jobs and deliver in excess of £25 million annual GVA for Manchester. Since then over £150m of construction investment had been made in the estate including schemes at 1 Angel Square, Hanover and Federation, City Buildings, the Hotel Indigo, and new residential accommodation at Angel Gardens.

 

A report now submitted by the Strategic Director, Growth and Development explained that an updated Strategic Regeneration Framework (SRF) had been drafted that sought to build on the progress achieved to date and respond to Manchester’s strong economic growth which had led to increased demand for commercial space within the city centre. The revision would also propose new policies on climate change and zero carbon. Optimising underutilised areas was to be a key priority, with the focus on bringing forward commercial development supported by new and integrated public realm. The details of the potential development schemes and sites were set out in detail.

 

The report proposed that there should now be a period of public consultation on the draft of the updated SRF. That was agreed.

 

Decisions

 

1.         To note the progress made to date at NOMA and the key challenges and opportunities for the next phases of development.

 

2.         To approve the draft NOMA SRF Update as a basis for consultation with local stakeholders, and request the Strategic Director, Growth and Director undertake that public consultation and report to the Executive on the comments received.

 

 

74.

First Street Development Framework Addendum 2020 pdf icon PDF 656 KB

The report of the Strategic Director – Growth & Development is enclosed.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

In February 2020 the Executive had endorsed, in principle, a draft addendum to the First Street development framework and requested that there be public consultation on it (Minute Exe/20/26). A report submitted by the Strategic Director, Growth and Development presented the outcome of the consultation. The report proposed that a revised and final version of the Framework Addendum now be approved.

 

The extended public consultation had run from the 6 March until 15 May 2020. Letters had been sent out to 3,636 local residents, landowners, businesses, and stakeholders, informing them about the public consultation, and how to participate in the process. The draft Addendum was also made available on the Council’s website. There had been 11 responses received: nine from local residents; one joint response from the three Deansgate Ward Councillors; and one response from a statutory consultee.

 

The report analysed in detail the responses of the consultees and the issues that they had raised under seven headings:

  • public realm
  • development architecture, heights and density
  • the framework document
  • development impacts
  • development uses
  • water management
  • general comments

 

The proposed responses to those issues were explained in the report along with the changes that had been made to the draft Addendum to accommodate and take into consideration the consultees responses.

 

Having considered the responses to the consultation, and the changes made to the document as a result of those, it was agreed that that the Addendum to the SRF be approved.

 

Decisions

 

1.         To note the outcome of the public consultation on the draft development framework addendum for the First Street neighbourhood.

 

2.         To approve the development framework addendum for the First Street area and request that Planning and Highways Committee take the framework into account as a material consideration when considering planning applications for the area.

 

 

75.

Co-living in Manchester pdf icon PDF 414 KB

The report of the Strategic Director - Growth & Development is enclosed.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

In December 2019 the Executive had considered a report on the concept of co-living and its place in the city. At that time the Executive had noted the concept and the issues around its development, the nature of the product, and the limited contribution that it could make to the city’s housing offer, and had requested that the Strategic Director, Growth and Development undertake a consultation process with key stakeholders and reports on the outcomes of that (Minute Exe/19/102).

 

The Strategic Director reported that the initial consultation on co-living had been carried out in two phases. A consultation process had taken place with developers and key organisations. (Phase 1). Consultation with wider stakeholders, including residents (Phase 2), had then taken place as part of the Local Plan review. The report explained that the Phase 1 stakeholder consultation had closed on 9 March 2020 and five developers had responded. They all expressed an interest in developing co-living schemes in Manchester, adding that:

·         the approach should be less cautious in the city centre and the amount of accommodation should not be limited;

·         there should be more flexibility about where it would be supported in the city centre;

·         the scope should be broadened to include existing successful business and not just new or recently arrived employers;

·         the size of units in co-living schemes should not necessarily have to comply with approved space standards;

·         restricting the length of tenancies could disrupt tenants;

·         some considered co-Living to be affordable housing;

·         zero carbon policy requirements could undermine viability; and.

·         co-Living schemes should not automatically exclude students.

 

The Phase 2 consultation had closed on 3 May. In that respondents had been asked to comment on this statement:

 

            “The emerging issue of co-living accommodation is a matter the plan will also need to address. The Council has recently set out an initial position on the matter, noting the issues around its development, the nature of the product, and the limited contribution it could make to the city’s housing offer. Further work will be required to help inform any policy approach that will feature in the Local Plan in due course. Other forms of short-term renting, including AirBnB, will also need to be addressed in the Local Plan.”

 

There had been 561 responses to that from residents, businesses, statutory consultees and partner agencies (although not all commented on the co-living statement). Most of the responses were from residents. Whilst most acknowledged the need for a range of good quality, affordable accommodation there was a general consensus that this should not include multi-occupation developments or subdivision of buildings into multiple units. There was also concern that car parking can be prioritised over green spaces when planning for multi-occupational developments, and there was often increased instances of littering and build-up of refuse in the surrounding areas of multi occupational buildings.

 

In responding to the issues that had been raised in both phases of the consultation, the report set out a proposed policy position on co-living for the Council to adopt pending  ...  view the full minutes text for item 75.

76.

Greater Manchester Clean Air Plan - Tackling Nitrogen Oxide Exceedances at the Roadside - Outline Business Case pdf icon PDF 528 KB

The joint report of the Deputy Chief Executive and the City Solicitor is enclosed.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

A joint report submitted by the Deputy Chief Executive and the City Solicitor set out the progress that had been made following the Government’s response to Greater Manchester’s Outline Business Case to tackle Nitrogen Dioxide Exceedances at the Roadside (OBC). The report explained the implications of relevant COVID-19 pandemic management policies for the 10 Greater Manchester (GM) local authorities in relation to the schedule of work and statutory consultation on the Clean Air Plan. It also set out the links to the taxi and private hire common minimum licensing standards (MLS).

 

The report set out the more recent work that had been undertaken across Greater Manchester on public engagement, consideration of future provision and support for commercial vehicles, and correspondence from Government on the next steps the Government required the GM Councils to take, a timetable for those, and an indication of the financial support the Government will provide for the implementation of the Clean Air Plan.

 

It was explained that the plans for consultation had been badly affected by the COVID-19 pandemic, as the consultation timetable had been due to commence but had to be suspended. As a result the overall programme was going to be set-back by four months.

 

Decisions

 

1.         To note the progress of the Greater Manchester Clean Air Plan.

 

2.         To note the progress in the development of the Clean Commercial Vehicle and Hardship funds.

 

3.         To note the initial funding award of £41m for clean vehicle funds to award grants or loans to eligible businesses.

 

4.         To note the Government has accepted the need for vehicle replacement funds for Hackney Carriages, and Light Goods Vehicles, but has requested further development of shared evidence on the needs within that complex sector before responding and does not support the sustainable journeys measure.

 

5.         To note that TfGM is seeking confirmation that the funding award for Bus Retrofit is a continuation of Clean Bus Technology Funds to be distributed as soon as possible as per previous arrangements.

 

6.         To note the government will not support electric vehicle charging infrastructure through Clean Air monies but have committed to work with GM on securing funding from the Office for Low Emission Vehicles (OLEV).

 

7.         To agree the position that the GM Local Authorities will move to a statutory public consultation on the GM Clean Air Plan as soon as reasonably practicable.

 

8.         To agree the position that the GM Local Authorities’ decision to commence a public consultation should be taken once there is a clear timeframe for exiting lockdown and moving to the next phase of the COVID-19 response.

 

9.         To note the implementation of a GM CAZ is delayed to 2022 with a revised implementation date to be confirmed in the consultation commencement report.

 

10.       To note the DfT’s positioning paper “Decarbonising Transport – Setting the Challenge”.

 

11.       To note the assessment of the possible impacts of COVID-19 to inform a technical briefing note for decision makers.

 

12.       To note that the GM local Authorities intend to consult  ...  view the full minutes text for item 76.

77.

Refresh of the Ancoats and New Islington Neighbourhood Development Framework – Poland Street Zone pdf icon PDF 853 KB

The report of the Strategic Director - Growth & Development was to follow and is now enclosed.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

In February 2020 the Executive had received a draft refreshed Neighbourhood Development Framework (NDF) for Ancoats and New Islington (Minute Exe/20/24).  The revised elements in that refresh had related to the back of Ancoats, referred to as the Poland Street Zone, and the former Central Retail Park. At that time the Executive had approved that a programme of public and stakeholder consultation should be undertaken.

 

That extended period of public consultation on revised proposals for the Poland Street Zone involving local residents, businesses, land and property owners, public and statutory bodies and community sector organisations had been undertaken between March and May 2020. Following this exercise, and based on the responses to that, a final draft of the Ancoats and New Islington NDF Poland Street Zone had been produced and was being proposed for approval.

 

The consultation plans had been affected by the COVID-19 pandemic and some planned events had had to be cancelled. The consultation techniques that had been employed included:

·         An updated Ancoats and New Islington consultation web page on the council’s website.

·         Letters to all local residents (465 addresses) within the study area consultation boundary.

·         Letters to local businesses within the study area registered on the Manchester City Council Business Rates Database.

·         Letters to property and landowners delivered to all freehold and leasehold interests registered at the land registry within the consultation boundary area.

·         Consultation notification emails to key public and statutory stakeholders.

·         Consultation notification emails to non-statutory stakeholder groups including community groups.

·         Press release and news articles on the manchester.gov.uk website, supported by social media.

·         A dedicated email address and telephone information line.

 

A total of 130 responses had been received: 119 via an online questionnaire and a further 11 by email. Of those, 120 of the responses were from people who live, work or visit the area frequently.  A further 2 responses were from a local community group, 4 responses from or on behalf of local landowners, and others from statutory consultees.

 

The responses to the consultation had been largely positive and recurring themes and comments had include:

·         strong support of the vision and priorities contained within the draft NDF update and the strategy to maximise opportunities for future development;

·         strong support for the proposals linked to reduced car use and improved connectivity and pedestrian and cycle routes through the area;

·         further comments were made in relation to car parking and how this is managed in terms of on street parking and centralised parking provision to service the area and support businesses and residents;

·         strong support for the objectives of maintaining the character and conservation status of the area and ensuring that appropriate consideration is given to this in future developments;

·         highlighting the need for flood management and sustainable drainage solutions where appropriate;

·         highlighting the need for design to positively address the waterways corridor and link to wider green and blue networks;

·         highlighting the need to consider flexibility on building massing and heights at certain locations in the area;

·         support for the delivery of  ...  view the full minutes text for item 77.

78.

Capital Programme Update pdf icon PDF 262 KB

The report of the Deputy Chief Executive and City Treasurer was to follow and is now enclosed.

 

An addendum for information has now been added to the report - Our Town Hall Project – Deferred Notice to Proceed into Construction

 

Additional documents:

Minutes:

A report concerning requests to increase the capital programme was submitted. We agreed to make two change under emergency powers established by the Council in March 2020, and to make a further seven changes under delegated powers. These changes would increase Manchester City Council’s capital budget by £4.726m funded by a mixture of government grants, borrowing and external contributions.

 

An addendum to the report explained that the “Our Town Hall” project had been paused so as to allow for an assessment to be made of the possible implications for the project of the COVID-19 outbreak, and of the high levels of construction cost inflation seen within Manchester. The addendum outlined the position for the Our Town Hall Project and the factors which had changed since February 2020 when a key decision to proceed with the project had been made. It explained why there was now a change in completion date from December 2023 to May 2024.

 

1.         To approve, under the emergency provision agreed by the Council on 25th March 2020 (minute CC/20/26), the following changes to Manchester City Council’s capital programme:

 

(a)  Children’s Services - Hyde Road Secondary School. A capital budget virement of £2m is requested, funded by Unallocated Education Basic Needs budget.

 

(b)  Growth and Development – Acquisition of Land at Red Bank. A capital budget virement of £1.705m is requested, funded by Northern Gateway Budget

 

2.         To approve the following changes to the City Council’s capital programme:

 

(c)  Highways Services – Chorlton to Manchester Scheme Development Costs. A capital budget increase of £1.432m is requested, funded by Mayor’s Challenge Fund.

 

(d)  Highways Services – Manchester Cycleway. A capital budget increase of £0.593m is requested, funded by Mayor’s Challenge Fund.

 

(e)  Highways Services – Northern Quarter Walking and Cycling Development Costs. A capital budget increase of £1.547m is requested, funded by Mayor’s Challenge Fund.

 

(f)   Highways Services – Beswick Filtered Neighbourhood Development Costs. A capital budget increase of £0.554m is requested, funded by Mayor’s Challenge Fund.

 

(g)  Children’s Services – Our Lady’s RC High School Expansion. A capital budget virement of £0.160m is requested, funded by Unallocated Education Basic Needs budget.

 

(h)  Children’s Services – Manchester Communication Academy Expansion. A capital budget virement of £0.111m is requested, funded by Unallocated Education Basic Needs budget.

 

(i)    Growth and Development – Acquisition of Land at Red Bank. A capital budget increase of £0.600m is requested, funded by Government Grant (Housing Infrastructure Fund)

 

3.         To note increases to the programme of £0.232m as a result of delegated approvals.

 

4.         To note the project cost plan (for Construction) for Our Town Hall project had been agreed with the Management Contractor in the terms described in the addendum to the report.

 

5.         To note that the Deputy Chief Executive and City Treasurer was now able to issue the Notice to Proceed for the “Our Town Hall” project, with construction therefore likely to commence on site in July 2020.