Agenda and draft minutes

Agenda and draft minutes

Executive - Wednesday, 17th November, 2021 2.00 pm

Venue: Council Chamber, Level 2, Town Hall Extension. View directions

Contact: Michael Williamson 

Note: This meeting can be viewed on Vimeo at https://vimeo.com/637587011 

Items
No. Item

102.

Minutes pdf icon PDF 162 KB

To approve as a correct record the minutes of the meeting held on 20 October 2021.

Minutes:

The Executive approved as a correct record the minutes of the meeting on 20 October 2021.

103.

COVID19 updates - Population Health and Economic Recovery pdf icon PDF 610 KB

The report of the Director of Public Health and the Director of City Centre Growth and Infrastructure is enclosed.

Minutes:

The Executive considered a report of the Director of Public Health and the Director of City Centre Growth and Infrastructure, which provided an update on the COVID-19 situation within the city and the progress that was being made with the city’s economic recovery.

 

The Executive Member for Health and Care advised that infection rates within the city were now 290 per 100,000 of the population and Manchester was currently 9th amongst Greater Manchester’s Local Authorities in terms of infection rates, with rates gradually increasing but remaining below the national average and the infection rate amongst the over 60’s was 148 per 100,000 which had significantly decreased over the past few weeks and put Manchester 10th across Greater Manchester.

 

Rates amongst school children remained higher than other groups and as such the in school and out of school  offer of vaccinations to 12 to 15 year olds would continue and all schools would be visited by the 1 December 2021.  The booster programme was well underway and people could now book their booster vaccination 5 months after their second vaccination dose. 65% of the city’s residents aged 70 or older had had their booster.  The vaccination team was working on plans to deliver the offer of second vaccinations to those aged 16-17 and for those aged 40-49 who were now eligible for a booster vaccination.

 

The Executive Member for Health and Care advised that events would be held to recognise those who had volunteered to help deliver the city’s vaccination programme. 

 

Councillor Karney sought clarity on the level of unvaccinated people admitted to Manchester and Greater Manchester hospitals with COVID related illnesses.  The Director of Public Health stated that a few months ago the majority of people being admitted were unvaccinated but over the last few months people had been admitted who had had both vaccinations, particular amongst the city’s older cohort, which was why the booster programme was important.  The Leader noted the unprecedented pressure the whole care system was under at this time of year, with current hospital occupancy levels being at 93%.

 

In relation to the city’s economic recovery, the Director of City Centre Growth and Infrastructure advised that office take up remained positive, with a number of SME’s taking up of larger office space.  Larger corporate businesses remained slow to return but this was attributed to the decision to return  being taken at national or headquarter level.  Recruitment challenges remained across all employment sectors of the city although the labour market was holding up at present.  There was concern around the increase in inflation and the rising cost of living and the impact of this on residents.  In relation to various sectors, Manchester Airport had reported that they were at 55% of pre-pandemic levels.  In terms of levelling up, the Council had been successful with its Culture in the City bid, with an award of £19.8m which would   support around 4000 jobs over a 15 year period.  The Council had also secured 90% of the  ...  view the full minutes text for item 103.

104.

Our Manchester progress update report pdf icon PDF 363 KB

The report of the Chief Executive is enclosed.

Minutes:

The Executive considered a report of the Chief Executive which provided an update on key areas of progress against the Our Manchester Strategy – Forward to 2025 which reset Manchester’s priorities for the next five years to ensure the Council could still achieve the city’s ambition set out in the Our Manchester Strategy 2016 – 2025.

 

The Deputy Leader (Finance) advised that work to transform Albert Square into a world class public space, increasing its size by around 20%, had got underway as part of the Our Town Hall project.  The changes involved the closure of two sides of the square to traffic with the former road space incorporated as part of the pedestrianised public space.  The first phase, focused on the area outside the existing square, had been brought forward and would now be completed next year, two years ahead of the original schedule, to minimise the impact on surrounding businesses and ensure they can benefit from its traffic-free environment more quickly, supporting their recovery from the impacts of the Covid-19 pandemic.

 

The Deputy Leader (Human Resources) advised that Manchester Art Gallery had reported that its visitor numbers were back up to pre-pandemic levels.  Since re-opening in May this year, the gallery has welcomed almost 200,000 visitors despite social distancing measures in place to limit the number of visitors in the building at any one time.  Taking into account the galleries reduced opening hours, this figure was equivalent to visitor numbers at the gallery before the first Covid-19 lockdown was imposed in March 2020.  In addition he advised that the Grayson’s Art Club exhibition, curated by artist Grayson Perry, had spearheaded the re-opening and had been a major factor in attracting people back through the gallery’s doors.

 

In relation to homelessness, the Deputy Leader (Human Resources) reported that the Council’s extended accommodation offer would run throughout the winter months from early December to 31 March and would include space for 50 individuals with en-suite rooms in a former hotel outside the city centre. These bed spaces would be targeted at people who have been identified by partners and outreach teams as having high priority need, and who have been on the streets for a long time and meet the criteria as set by the Homelessness Partnership.  In addition to this, there would be 50 bed spaces provided in a hotel close to the city centre. These bed spaces would only be activated during prolonged cold weather, when the temperature was forecasted to drop below zero, and would offer secure and Covid-safe spaces with support services in place to help people until they could move into more permanent accommodation.  There would also be access to 186 -A Bed Every Night - spaces jointly funded by Manchester City Council and Greater Manchester Combined Authority, plus 30 additional spaces in a hotel in Fallowfield which was now an annual council scheme for people sleeping rough

 

The Deputy Leader (Human Resources) also commented on the recent allegations of racism in cricket  ...  view the full minutes text for item 104.

105.

Revenue Budget Monitoring report - P6 pdf icon PDF 247 KB

Report of the Deputy Chief Executive and City Treasurer attached

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Executive considered a report of the Deputy Chief Executive and City Treasurer, which outlined  the projected outturn position for 2021/22, based on expenditure and income activity as at the end of September 2021 and future projections.

 

The Deputy Leader (Finance) advised that the current budget monitoring forecast was estimating an underspend of £1.161m for the year.  The impact of COVID 19 was still being felt and there were significant uncertainties and risks to the position as COVID 19 restrictions ease, with significant potential risks around services to Adults, Children’s and Homelessness of increasing demand leading to additional costs.

 

In relation to the delivery of the £40.717m of savings identified as part of the budget process the majority are on track for delivery. However, £1.841m (4.5%)  of these were considered high risk and a further £4.365m (10.7%) were medium risk, in terms of the likelihood of delivery. Officers were working to address the risk to ensure all savings are achieved or mitigated

 

It was reported that there remained a significant budget shortfall to 2025/26 alongside uncertainty about the future funding settlement an a report would be brought back to the Executive to consider the longer-term position and proposed mitigations as part of the budget process.

 

Decision

 

The Executive:-

 

(1)             Note the forecast outturn position which is showing a £1.161m underspend.

(2)             Approve the proposed revenue budget virements.

(3)             Approve additional COVID 19 grants to be reflected in the budget

(4)             Approve the use of other unbudgeted external grant funding (non COVID 19)

106.

Spending Review and budget update pdf icon PDF 322 KB

Report of the Deputy Chief Executive and City Treasurer attached

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Executive considered a report of the Deputy Chief Executive and City Treasurer, which provided an update on the main announcements from the Spending Review on 27 October 2021 with a focus on the implications for local government funding and what this meant for the Council's budget position and the proposed budget process.

 

The Deputy Leader (Finance) commented that following the Spending Review announcements and other updates, the Council was forecasting an estimated shortfall of £4m in 2022/23, £64m in 2023/24 and £85m by 2024/25.  The position would be clearer in December when the Local Government Finance Settlement was received although that was unlikely to provide detailed funding allocations for after 2022/23.

 

A longer-term strategy to close the budget gap was being prepared with an estimated requirement to find budget cuts and savings in the region of £40m per annum for 2023/24 and 2024/25.  In addition, £50.6m of risk-based reserves had been identified as available to manage risk and timing differences.

 

The Deputy Chief Executive and City Treasurer commented that whilst the Spending Review announcement was better than expected, it still did not address long term pressures around demand, inflation and a suitable funding solution for Adult Social Care.  There was concern in relation to the longer term position and the funding shortfall beyond the next financial year.

 

A further report would be presented to the Executive following the receipt of the Local Government Finance Settlement.

 

Decision

 

The Executive notes the Spending Review announcements and the forecast medium term revenue budget position

107.

Capital Programme Monitoring 2021/22 pdf icon PDF 656 KB

Report of the Deputy Chief Executive and City Treasurer attached

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Executive considered a report of the Deputy Chief Executive and City Treasurer, which provided an update on the progress of the global capital programme in the three months to the end of September 2021, including activity, benefits realised, financial implications and risk.  It also provided a more detailed update on the major projects within the programme and confirmed that there were adequate levels of resources available to finance the capital programme.

 

The Deputy Leader (Finance) commented that the revised capital budget sat at £493.7m, with a further £601.5m budgeted to be spent across 2022-2025, taking total Council led capital investment in the city to £1.095.2m. 

 

To reflect the climate change emergency that the Council had declared, every capital expenditure business cases now included carbon reduction measures for both during the project progression stage and the ongoing lifecycle post completion.  The intention being that the carbon footprint of a scheme was considered as part of the decision-making process.  In addition, every capital project was required to consider the social value which could be realised, either through procurement or other routes, through the creation of the asset. This was one of the key requirements of any capital business case brought forward. 

 

 The Deputy Leader (Finance) also stated that the capital programme was varied, and included significant spend across the city, not just within the city centre and highlighted a number of schemes as detailed din the report.

 

Decision

 

The Executive note the report and the change to the applicable mortgage rate as detailed at paragraph 11.2 of the report

108.

Delivery of the Household Support Fund pdf icon PDF 423 KB

Report of the Deputy Chief Executive and City Treasurer attached

Minutes:

The Executive considered a report of the Deputy Chief Executive and City Treasurer, which set out the Council’s approach to delivering the Household Support Fund.  The aim of the fund was to support households in the city during the winter period with household and other essential expenses.

 

The Deputy Leader (Finance) commented that the Council would receive £6.453m from the Household Support Fund for a six-month period from October 2021 to end of March 2022.  This budget was a fraction of the estimated £30 million that had been removed from UC claimants as a result of the withdrawal of the £20 UC uplift.  The removal of the uplift affected an estimated 59,000 residents of the 78,000 residents/households in receipt of UC in the city, many of whom had household costs to manage. 

 

It was reported that at least 50% of the total funding would be spent on families with children.  In terms of type of support, the expectation was that the Household Support Fund should primarily be used to support households in the most need with food, energy and water bills.  It could also be used to support households with essential costs related to those items and with wider essential costs.  In exceptional cases of genuine emergency, it could additionally be used to support housing costs where existing housing support schemes did not meet this need.

 

In addition to this, if the Council wished to support ongoing free school meal provision during the school holidays that were within this six-month scheme period, then this would require circa £1.7m from the £6.453m allocation before any wider awards or consideration.

 

Councillor Karney lambasted the current government for its failure to recognise the damage that the last ten years of austerity had had on residents living in Manchester and the miniscule amount of funding now being offered was an insult against the decision by government to remove the UC uplift and the ramifications that this had on Manchester residents.

 

Decisions

 

The Executive:-

 

(1)      Agree the government funding for the Household Support Fund of £6.453m is mainly used for direct awards to support residents during the winter months. Although the Council will quantify the admin costs, it will not deduct all of these from the grant award.

 

(2)      Agree that the Council administers the Household Support Fund scheme in four key parts to support Manchester residents, this includes the provision of:-

 

(i)            Support to families to provide free school meals during the holidays, including free school meals for the reminder of the school holidays in this financial year, equating to £15 per pupil per week with money distributed to households on a pupil basis via schools.

 

(ii)          A universal offer to recipients of Council Tax Support and other key groups that includes a payment to all households in the city in receipt of CTS, other key groups, including care leavers responsible for the Council Tax bill in their property and residents who are exempt from council tax due to being severely mentally impaired, equating  ...  view the full minutes text for item 108.

109.

Better Care Fund Section 75 2021/22 pdf icon PDF 224 KB

Report of the Deputy Chief Executive and City Treasurer and City Solicitor attached

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Executive considered a report of the Deputy Chief Executive and City Treasurer, which set out the proposed Section 75 (S75) between Manchester CCG and Manchester City Council on the Better Care Fund and the Improved Better Care Fund (BCF).

 

The Executive Member for Health and Care advised that on 1 April 2021, new arrangements came into place between the Council and Manchester Foundation Trust (MFT) to ‘supercharge’ Manchester’s Local Care Organisation.  This included the creation of a new Section 75 (S75) between the Council and MFT which included Adult Social Care services, which previously made part of the S75 between Manchester Clinical Commissioning Group (MCCG) and the Council.  Consequently, as a result of these changes, the MCCG / Council S75 needed to be amended to reflect the new arrangements.  Consequently, as a result of these changes, the MCCG/Council S75 needed to be amended to reflect the new arrangements. 

 

Following discussions between MCCG and the Councils’ finance and governance teams, it was agreed that the approach would be to revert back to as close as possible to the pre 2017 S75 arrangements on the BCF.  The updated S75 had been presented to and endorsed by, MHCC Executive and Finance Committee on 21 October 2021 and the CCG’s Governing Body on the 27 October 2021

 

Decisions

 

The Executive:-

 

(1)      Approve the proposed S75 on the Better Care Fund and the Improved Better Care Fund set out in Appendix One.

 

(2)      Agree that delegated authority be given to the Deputy Chief Executive and City Treasurer and City Solicitor, in consultation with Executive Member with responsibility for Health and Care, for any minor finalisation amendments to be made to the document.


110.

Adoption Counts - Regional Adoption Agency pdf icon PDF 339 KB

Report of the Strategic Director (Children and Families) attached

Minutes:

The Executive considered a report of the Strategic Director Children and Education Services, which sought approval to formally and permanently transfer staff from Manchester into Stockport Council (host organisation) under TUPE regulations.

 

The Executive Member for Children’s Services advised that in 2017, the Council’s Senior Management Team and Executive supported a proposal from the Strategic Director of Children’s Services for Manchester’s adoption service to merge with four other local authorities (Stockport, Trafford, Salford, and Cheshire East) and two voluntary adoption agencies (Adoption Matters and Caritas) to form a Regional Adoption Agency which was known as ‘Adoption Counts’.  Stockport were nominated as the host organisation for the Regional Adoption Agency, and it was agreed in 2017 to temporarily second adoption staff from Manchester, Trafford, Salford and Cheshire East into Stockport whilst the RAA was established and developed.

 

The proposal to formally transfer the staff into the host organisation was expected to further improve management support and oversight, organisational performance, organisational identity and relationships as all the staff working in the RAA would become part of a single organisation and no longer have to experience a set of temporary organisational arrangements.

 

It was noted that he report had been considered by the Children and Young people’s Scrutiny Committee who had supported the recommendations.

 

Decisions

 

The Executive:-

 

(1)      Agrees the adoption service for Manchester City Council is integrated into the Regional Adoption Agency ‘Adoption Counts’.

(2)      Approves the transfer of the service and notes that staff who are assigned to the service will transfer to Stockport under TUPE regulations.

111.

Grey Mare Lane Master Plan pdf icon PDF 351 KB

Report of the Strategic Director (Growth and Development) attached

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Executive considered a report of the Strategic Director (Growth and Development), which sought approval in-principle for land to be disposed of to One Manchester (OM) for development, subject to the achievement of agreed milestones, as part of the  proposals for the transformation and regeneration of the Grey Mare Lane Estate in Beswick, East Manchester.

 

The Executive Member for Housing and Employment advised that the regeneration of Grey Mare Lane was being led and funded by OM with an . overall investment to be an estimated value of £70m.  The scheme involved the provision of 290 new affordable homes, which would include 124 for social rent.  There would also be investment in community facilities and a community hub as well as public realm investment alongside the retrofitting of 150 existing homes to make them low carbon and reduce fuel bills.

 

The Strategic Director (Growth and Development) confirmed that the disposal of the Council’s land interest would enable the comprehensive regeneration of the estate by enabling the delivery of additional housing to allow an element cross subsidy across the scheme, which will fund the public realm, street scape, a new community hub and the transformation of Grey mare lane into an attractive high street

 

Decisions

 

The Executive:-

 

(1)      Note the progress made to date by One Manchester in developing proposals for the regeneration of the Grey Mare Lane estate:

 

(2)      Endorse the Masterplan for the Grey Mare Lane Estate, which from this point forwards, will act as a point of co-ordination for future regeneration activity, including the submission by One Manchester of detailed planning applications on a phased basis.

 

(3)      Approve in-principle the disposal of land shown in Appendix 2 and as set out in the body of the report; the timing of such disposals being subject to the successful achievement of milestones including the receipt of relevant planning consents and the re-provision of a new Community Hub to replace the current Grange Centre.

 

(4)      Delegate authority to the Strategic Director Growth and Development and the Deputy Chief Executive and City Treasurer, in consultation with the Executive Member for Housing and Economy and the Statutory Deputy Leader, to finalise the terms of specific land disposals as and when necessary, to facilitate the regeneration and housing outcomes as set out in the body of the report.

 

(5)      Authorise the City Solicitor to complete the legal documentation required to put these recommendations into effect

112.

Streets for All Strategy pdf icon PDF 597 KB

Report of the Director of City Centre Growth and Infrastructure attached

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Executive considered a report of the Director of City Centre Growth and Infrastructure, which provided an overview of the Streets for All Strategy, which formed a sub strategy to the Greater Manchester Transport Strategy and would enable the Council to deliver its ambitions for walking, cycling and bus in a holistic way.  The approach set out in Streets for All would also support the Council’s pathway to net zero transport, which was vital to the Government’s ‘Decarbonising Transport’ plan, alongside the Council’s local plans to reduce carbon and improve air quality.

 

The Executive Member for Environment advised that  the Streets for All Strategy was well-aligned with national policy documents, including ‘Gear Change: A bold vision for Cycling and Walking’ (2020) in which Government outlined its ambition to create better streets for people walking and cycling, and ‘Bus Back Better: A National Bus Strategy for England’ (2021) in which Government asked all Local Transport Authorities to ‘commit to significant improvements in traffic management, including bus priority measures and active travel measures.  It was a new approach to everything people did on streets in Greater Manchester and it supported the Council’s place-based agenda as well as aimed to achieve the ambition for more travel by walking, cycling and public transport, which would help us to tackle our most pressing economic, environmental, quality of life and innovation challenges.

 

Central to the strategy was reducing the distances people needed to travel to reach everyday destinations such as work, healthcare, education, green spaces, and leisure facilities.  Shorter distances meant more trips that could easily be walked or cycled, and new developments could be designed to be easy and safe to access on foot, by cycle and using public transport.  The 15 minute neighbourhood concept, whereby in urban areas residents could meet most of their needs within a short walk, cycle, or public transport journey, was an example of this.

 

The Executive Member for Environment highlighted measures that the Council was already taking in applying a Streets for All approach as it planned for and delivered key sustainable transport infrastructure projects across Manchester.

 

Decision

 

The Executive endorse the approach and the principles that will underpin the Streets for All Strategy.

113.

Withington Baths Financial Support pdf icon PDF 241 KB

Report of the Strategic Director (Neighbourhoods) attached

Minutes:

The Executive considered a report of the Strategic Director (Neighbourhoods), which provided details of a proposed £1 million loan by Manchester City Council to Love Withington Baths Charitable Trust which would enable essential repairs to the facility that provides valuable swimming, leisure and well-being activities in south Manchester.

 

The Executive Member for Neighbourhoods explained that the facility had been operated on a full repair and maintenance lease and in addition to annual maintenance work, refurbishment of both studios, redeveloped upstairs unused area into workspace and refurbished sauna had all been financed from Love Withington Baths own profits, crowdfunding and a loan for the workspace.  The structural fabric of the 110-year-old building was now in need of considerable repair, in particular the roof of the building, but also some repairs to the external elevations and to the building’s structural elements, including a significant amount of reinforced concrete around the pool and replacement of the boiler.

 

In 2019 the Baths were successful in securing Heritage Lottery funding for £900,000.  An additional £230,000 from the Baths’ own reserves was intended to cover all the anticipated £1.1million project costs.  A robust and transparent tendering process undertaken by the Baths had returned tendered costs considerably higher than anticipated. Three prices were submitted to the Baths, with the preferred tender coming in at around £2.1 million reflecting the rapid increase in construction costs.  Consequently, there was a significant gap in funding of around £1 million.  Some value engineering work had taken place along with prioritisation of works, to reduce the overall cost.  However, the ability to achieve cost reductions or reduce the scope of the works was limited to ensure the long term condition of the building and to ensure that the works were in keeping with the architectural quality of the building required by the National Heritage Lottery Fund.  As a result of the financial shortfall and the risk factors associated with not proceeding with the works, Love Withington Baths Charitable Trust had approached the Council for financial assistance.

 

If agreed, the loan to Love Withington Baths Charitable Trust would be repayable over a long payment period of a maximum of 25 years, based on the expected life of the works

 

Decisions

 

The Executive:-

 

(1)         Note the background and rationale for the provision of this loan.

(2)         Recommend to Council a capital budget increase of £1 million for the purpose of a loan from Manchester City Council to Love Withington Baths Charitable Trust, to be over a repayment period of a maximum of 25 years, and to be funded from borrowing.

(3)         Delegate authority to the Deputy Chief Executive and City Treasurer, and City Solicitor, in consultation with the Deputy Leader (Statutory). to agree and finalise the terms of the loan.

(4)         Delegate authority to the City Solicitor to enter into all contractual and ancillary arrangements to give effect to the recommendations set out in this report

114.

Refresh of the Greater Manchester VCSE Accords pdf icon PDF 498 KB

Report of the Deputy Chief Executive and City Treasurer attached

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Executive considered a report of the Deputy Chief Executive and City Treasurer, which provided an overview of key activities in Manchester to support the Voluntary, Community and Social  Enterprise (VCSE) sector. 

 

The Greater Manchester Combined Authority (GMCA) had requested all 10 GM local authority areas to approve and endorse the GM VCSE Accord, with the GMCA having already approved it.

 

The Leader advised that the GM Accord represented a continuation of the approach currently adopted in Manchester, and would help to strengthen commitments across GM to build a stronger and more resilient VCSE sector that could best supported and delivered for Manchester residents.

 

Decision

 

The Executive approve the new GM VCSE Accord and confirm its endorsement on behalf of Manchester

115.

Manchester International Festival Evaluation pdf icon PDF 711 KB

Report of the Strategic Director (Neighbourhoods) attached

Minutes:

The Executive considered a report of the Strategic Director (Neighbourhoods), which provided an overview of the outcomes of the 2021 Manchester International Festival (MIF21). The report summarised the performance against the agreed objectives and details the impact of the festival, based on the results of the independent evaluation and demonstrated how the festival delivered an inspiring programme which enabled Manchester residents and wider audiences to return to the city to enjoy arts and culture, despite the challenges and uncertainty of COVID-19.

 

The Deputy Leader (Human Resources) commented that despite the challenges and uncertainty of Covid, MIF21 inspired residents of Manchester and beyond to return to the city and enjoy a programme of art, dance, theatre and music, delivered through an immersive series of events that utilised outside spaces like never before. 

 

John McGrath, Artistic Director & Chief Executive MIF reported that MIF developed a range of scenarios for the various potential levels of restriction that might be in place.  He paid tribute to the MIF team as at any one time, MIF was running five or more differing scenarios for the festival, and for each project within it, ranging from full lockdown to ‘business as usual’, and with several versions of a socially-distant or blended festival also in play.  He commented that the festival could not have happened without the extraordinary relationship that cultural sector and MIF had with the Council. 

 

Despite the impact of Covid on the media landscape, MIF21 generated strong press coverage across print, online and broadcast media including news announcements, previews of MIF shows, and features, interviews and reviews. 

 

It was also reported that MIF21 was the last Manchester International Festival to take place before the opening of the city’s new flagship cultural venue The Factory. As such it provided a citywide and international platform to build profile, raise awareness and introduce elements of The Factory brand to audiences, partners, press and stakeholders locally, nationally and internationally

 

Randel Bryan, Executive Director MIF, advised the Executive that whilst MIF21 was a socially distanced festival due to Covid, a large number of free and online events made it possible to reach a record number of audiences locally, nationally and internationally and as a result the 2021 festival reached 2,662,244 people (compared with 302,161 in 2019) – 1,462,244 in person and 1,200,000 online  He added that whilst the effects of Covid had meant that the economic impact of the 2021 Festival was lower than previous years, the total economic impact of MIF21 estimated to be £19.5million.  The festival also played an important role in terms of employment.  69 staff now worked for the festival all year round and a further 83 were contracted by the festival for a minimum of three weeks during the festival period as well as an additional 62 office-based freelancers. In addition, to deliver the festival, MIF contracted a further 680 people who worked as performers, stage managers, front of house staff or technicians on MIF commissions.

Decisions

 

The Executive:-

 

(1)      Note the substantial  ...  view the full minutes text for item 115.

116.

Update on the CCTV Code of Good Practice pdf icon PDF 239 KB

Report of the Strategic Director (Neighbourhoods) attached

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Executive considered a report of the Strategic Director (Neighbourhoods), which advised of changes required to the Council’s CCTV Code of Practice (COP) since it was last updated in 2019.

 

The Executive member for Neighbourhoods reported that the only significant change to the COP is the insertion of paragraph 5.4.3.4 relating to the operation of the CCTV system by the Greater Manchester  Police (‘GMP’).  This meant that a number of designated GMP officers in the Silver Command Control room, the City Centre policing team and associated radio operators would also be able to view all CCTV cameras in the City Centre independently of a Council CCTV operator.

 

In addition to being able to view a camera those GMP officers would also have the ability to use the pan, tilt, and zoom features of all cameras they had access to.  All such viewing and also use of the features of the CCTV cameras would be controlled through a single generic user account and GMP would be required to keep records to show which individual officers were using the CCTV cameras at any time.  Representatives of the Council, and other Greater Manchester partners such as the Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Service and the North West  Ambulance Service would also had access to view the CCTV feedback when working in the Silver Command Control room

 

Decision

 

The Executive approve the updated Manchester City Council CCTV Code of Practice.

117.

HS2 Tramway Consent (Part A) pdf icon PDF 272 KB

Report of the Strategic Director (Growth and Development) attached

Minutes:

The Executive considered a report of the Director of City Centre Growth and Infrastructure, which provided an overview of the consent requested by HS2 Limited under Standing Order 25 for the inclusion, in the High Speed Rail (Crewe to Manchester) hybrid Bill, of works associated with the construction of a tramway on the public highway in the Piccadilly ward of Manchester.

 

The Assistant Executive Member for Transport advised that the Council, alongside its Greater Manchester partners, continued to support the development and delivery of High Speed Two (HS2) and Northern Powerhouse Rail (NPR) at a local, regional and national level.  The Council remained committed to working collaboratively with HS2 Limited and Government to ensure that both rail schemes fully aligned with the economic growth context for the city, as well as adjacent and linked regeneration initiatives and other transport infrastructure schemes, to ensure that the optimum solution was delivered in Manchester, which maximised a once in a lifetime opportunity.

 

Following representations from the Council and TfGM, HS2 Limited had agreed to include a relocated and enhanced Metrolink stop as part of the HS2 station at Manchester Piccadilly.  Benefits of the new Metrolink stop at Piccadilly included a significantly improved passenger experience, enhanced capacity to accommodate future growth (in both passengers and services) and enabled improved integration with the existing railway station and the

anticipated HS2 station.

 

The consent under Standing Order 25 would not directly grant HS2 Limited the powers to construct the tramway works in the Piccadilly ward. The  consent under Standing Order 25 was merely to allow deposit of a hybrid Bill containing the proposed powers to construct a tramway within the City of Manchester.

 

There would be further opportunities for the Council to make representations on the content of the hybrid Bill itself. The granting of Standing Order 25 consent would not prejudice the ability to petition against the hybrid Bill, or specific parts of the hybrid Bill.

 

It was explained that the substantive decision making for the Executive was contained within the Part B report and as such, the Executive was asked to note this Part A report.

 

The Leader commented that if government was serious about levelling up, then it needed to keep its promises, especially in relation to delivering an Integrated Rail Plan and the delivery of an underground HS2 rail station integrated with a Northern Power House rail services station providing through services from Liverpool through to Leeds via Bradford.  He added that without the level of investment requested, levelling up would not be possible.

 

Decision

 

The Executive note the report

118.

Exclusion of the Public

The officers consider that the following item or items contains exempt information as provided for in the Local Government Access to Information Act and that the public interest in maintaining the exemption outweighs the public interest in disclosing the information. The Executive is recommended to agree the necessary resolutions excluding the public from the meeting during consideration of these items. At the time this agenda is published no representations have been made that this part of the meeting should be open to the public.

Minutes:

Decision

 

The Executive agrees to exclude the public during consideration of the following item which involved consideration of exempt information relating to the financial or business affairs of particular persons and public interest in maintaining the exemption outweighs the public interest in disclosing the information.

119.

HS2 Tramway Consent (Part B)

Report of the Strategic Director (Growth and Development) attached

Minutes:

The Executive considered a report of the Director of City Centre Growth and Infrastructure, which provided an overview of the consent requested by HS2 Limited under Standing Order 25 for the inclusion, in the High Speed Rail (Crewe to Manchester) hybrid Bill, of works associated with the construction of a tramway on the public highway in the Piccadilly ward of Manchester.

 

Decisions

 

The Executive:-

 

(1)      Note and, for the purposes of Standing Order 25 (Consents in case of tramway bill) of both Houses of Parliament relating to Private Business, give formal consent to the inclusion in the High Speed Rail (Crewe-Manchester) hybrid Bill in the Session 2021-22 of the tramway works in the Piccadilly ward within the City of Manchester..

 

(2)      Authorise the City Solicitor to provide a Certificate of Consent under Standing Order 25 to HS2 Limited

 

120.

This City - Funding for Phase 1 Development (Part B)

Report of the Deputy Chief Executive and City Treasurer attached

Minutes:

The Executive considered a report of the Deputy Chief Executive and City Treasurer, which outlined a funding request for the delivery of the first scheme through the Council’s housing delivery vehicle, This City, at Rodney Street in the Ancoats and Beswick Ward, which would deliver 128 new homes.

 

Decisions

 

The Executive:-

 

(1)      Note the content of this report and the rationale for the timing of the financing request for the first scheme delivered via This City.

 

(2)      Recommend that the Council approve a capital budget increase of £33m funded by prudential borrowing.

 

(3)      Note that no funding will be spent or contracts entered into until the This City Business Case is approved by the Executive on 15 December 2021.