Manchester City Council

Agenda and draft minutes

Agenda and draft minutes

Executive - Wednesday, 11th November, 2020 2.00 pm

Venue: Virtual meeting - https://manchester.public-i.tv/core/portal/webcast_interactive/485350

Contact: Donald Connolly 

Media

Items
No. Item

114.

Minutes pdf icon PDF 512 KB

To approve as a correct record the minutes of the meeting held on 14 October 2020.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Decision

 

To approve as a correct record the minutes of the meeting on 14 October 2020.

115.

COVID-19 Monthly Update Report pdf icon PDF 1 MB

The report of the Chief Executive was to follow and is now enclosed.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The written report from the Chief Executive took the form of three “situation reports”, one each for the work on the city’s economic recovery, work with residents and communities, and work on the future of the Council itself. The written report was noted.

 

At the meeting the Executive Member, Councillor Craig, gave a brief update on significant developments in recent weeks. The number of cases in Manchester was currently just under 440 cases per 100,000 people, so the number of cases in the city had been declining and stabilising. However, the situation in the health and care system was very challenging: hospitals, primary care, GP and mental health services were all under considerable pressure, and there had been a suspension of routine non-specialist care in some hospitals to help create more capacity for Covid-19 patients. She praised the fantastic work the city’s health and care staff during this period of enormous pressures. She emphasised that the rest of the health and care system was still accessible and open to people with other conditions with an emergency or urgent care need.

 

The Executive Member then spoke of the recent press announcement of a highly effective vaccine. She said that the Council had started to plan a vaccination programme some months earlier and that some patience was now needed as a vaccination programme would have to target the most vulnerable and most at risk including health and care staff. She also spoke of the recent announcements of a mass testing initiative. Manchester was to receive 10,000 such tests initially, potentially increasing to 10% of the population each week. She concluded by referring to the ongoing support the city council and the community hub was providing to those who had previously been classed as ‘shielding’. That support was going to remain in place during this second lock-down period that the government had introduced from Thursday 5 November until Wednesday 2 December.

 

The Director of Public Health then explained that the Programme Office for the mass-vaccination programme had been established, with expertise from across the health services and the council. A similar programme was about to be established for the mass-testing programme which the Executive Member had spoken of.

 

Decision

 

To note the report.

 

 

116.

Greater Manchester Spatial Framework Publication Draft 2020 pdf icon PDF 314 KB

The report of the Strategic Director Growth and Development is enclosed.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

A report submitted by the Strategic Director (Growth and Development) sought approval for the consultation on the publication stage of the Greater Manchester Spatial Framework (GMSF) pursuant to Regulation 19 of the Town and Country Planning (Local Planning) (England) Regulations 2012.

 

The Greater Manchester Spatial Framework Publication Plan 2020 (GMSF 2020) is the city region’s plan to manage growth so that Greater Manchester is a better place to live, work and visit. It will:

              set out how Greater Manchester should develop up to the year 2037;

              identify the amount of new development that will come forward across the ten individual local authority districts, in terms of housing, offices, and industry and warehousing, and the main areas in which this will be focused;

              identify the important environmental assets across the conurbation which will be protected and enhanced;

              allocate sites for employment and housing outside of the urban area;

              support the delivery of key infrastructure, such as transport and utilities; and

              define a new Green Belt boundary for Greater Manchester.

 

Work on this plan had begun in 2014. Over the course of 2014/15, the 10 authorities secured the approvals required to enable the GMSF to be prepared. The first draft of the GMSF Joint Development Plan was published for consultation on 31st October 2016. A further consultation on the Revised Draft GMSF then took place between January and March 2019. Over 17,000 responses were received. Since that consultation closed, work had been underway across the GM area to analyse the responses and a consultation summary report was published in October 2019.

 

The next stage in the development of the plan would be the Publication Draft. The ‘Publication stage’ is a formal consultation on the draft joint Development Plan pursuant to Reg. 19 of the Local Planning Regulations. It is a statutory stage that provides an opportunity for organisations and individuals to submit their final views on the content of the plan.

 

The consent of Manchester to the publication was given, and the necessary authorities were delegated to allow minor changes to be made to the documents up to their final publication.

 

Decisions

 

1.         To approve the GMSF: Publication Draft 2020, including strategic site allocations and green belt boundary amendments, and reference to the potential use of compulsory purchase powers to assist with site assembly, and the supporting background documents, for publication pursuant to Regulation 19 of the Town and Country Planning (Local Planning) (England) Regulations 2012 for a period for representations between 1 December 2020 and 26 January 2021.

 

2.         To recommend that Council approves the GMSF: Publication Draft 2020 for submission to the Secretary of State for examination following the period for representations.

 

3.         To delegate to the Strategic Director (Growth and Development) authority to approve the relevant Statement of Common Ground(s) required pursuant to the National Planning Policy Framework 2019.

 

4.         To delegate authority to the Chief Executive in consultation with the Executive Member for Executive member for Environment, Planning and Transport to make  ...  view the full minutes text for item 116.

117.

The Council's Financial Position and Strategy from 2021/22 pdf icon PDF 253 KB

The report of the Deputy Chief Executive and City Treasurer is enclosed.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

A report from the Deputy Chief Executive and City Treasurer set out the impact of COVID-19 and other pressures on the Council’s future financial position, and changes on the Council's budget for the period 2021-2025. It summarised the savings options under consideration from 2021/22 as well as the approach to Equality Impact Assessments and consultation as part of the budget setting process. It also set out next steps in the budget process, including consideration of the draft budget options by scrutiny committees.

 

The budget assumptions that underpinned the planning for 2021/22 to 2024/25 included the commitments made as part of the 2020/21 budget process to fund ongoing demand pressures and the Adult Social Care Improvement Plan as well as provision to meet other known pressures such as inflation and any pay awards. Also anticipated were ongoing costs of around £25m as a result of COVID-19. including £13.5m for Adult Social Care, £7.5m for Homelessness Services and £3.8m for Children’s services. The projected budget shortfall for 2021/22 was £135m rising to £146.8m in the following year. The government announcement that the Collection Fund deficit could be smoothed over three years had improved the position in 2021/22 but worsened the two subsequent years. The planned additional use of reserves in 2020/21 could also now be deferred to help the position in 2021/22. This would reduce the 2021/22 gap to £105m, rising to almost £160m in 2022/23.

 

Budget Projections

Revised

2020/21

£000

2021/22

£000

2022/23

 £000

2023/24

 £000

2024/25

 £000

Budget shortfall

271

135,958

146,801

110,143

123,391

Sales, fees and charges support (estimate)*

(6,400)

0

0

0

0

Smooth Collection Fund over 3 years:

0

(24,381)

12,190

12,190

0

Defer planned use of reserves to balance the budget

6,129

(6,129)

 

 

 

Total - Potential Budget Gap

0

105,448

158,991

122,333

123,391

 

The true financial position for the next year and beyond would only be known when the government announced the 2021/22 financial settlement for local councils, and that might be delayed to December. In advance of the announcement of the level of government support for the Council the Council’s officers had examined where cuts and savings might be made in future years to reduce the Council’s expenditure or generate more income, so as to allow the budget for 2021/22 to be balanced. Those options were detailed in a series of reports that accompanied this report, one for each of the main directorates of the Council.

 

Decision

 

At this point in the development of a budget for 2021/22, to note the cuts and savings options that had been identified by officers, as well as the responses of the six scrutiny committees to those options.

 

 

118.

Children and Education Services Budget 2021/22 - 2024/25 pdf icon PDF 496 KB

The report of the Strategic Director for Children’s and Education Services is enclosed.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The report from the Strategic Director contained draft savings options totalling £11.295m over 2021/22-2024/25. This report on savings, income and cuts had also been considered by the Children and Young People Scrutiny Committee at a recent meeting, and the Committee’s views on the proposals were noted (Minute CYPSC/20/47).

 

Decision

 

At this point in the development of a budget for 2021/22, to note the report and the budget cuts and savings options it contained.

119.

Health Budget Options for 2021/22 pdf icon PDF 411 KB

The joint report of the Acting Chief Executive Manchester Local Care Organisation and Executive Director of Adult Social Services is enclosed.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The report from the Strategic Director explained that the financial options for the 2021/22 pooled budget were a £23m investment and £20m savings target, which represents a net increase of £3m. This report on expenditure, savings, income and cuts had also been considered by the Health Scrutiny Committee at a recent meeting, and the Committee’s views on the proposals were noted (Minute HSC/20/43).

 

Decision

 

At this point in the development of a budget for 2021/22, to note the report and the budget cuts and savings options it contained.

 

 

120.

Neighbourhoods Directorate Budget Options 2021/22 pdf icon PDF 357 KB

The report of the Strategic Director (Neighbourhoods) is enclosed.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The report from the Strategic Director contained draft savings options totalling £1.391m over 2021/22-2024/25. This report on savings, income and cuts had also been considered by the Neighbourhoods and Environment Scrutiny Committee and by the Communities and Equalities Scrutiny Committee at recent meetings, and the Committees’ views on the proposals were noted (Minute NESC/20/46) and (CESC/20/46).

 

Decision

 

At this point in the development of a budget for 2021/22, to note the report and the budget cuts and savings options it contained.

 

 

121.

Homelessness Directorate Budget and Savings Options 2021/22 pdf icon PDF 341 KB

The report of the Director of Homelessness is enclosed.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The report from the Director contained draft savings options totalling £3.574m over 2021/22-2024/25. This report on savings, income and cuts had also been considered by the Neighbourhoods and Environment Scrutiny Committee at a recent meeting, and the Committee’s views on the proposals were noted (Minute NESC/20/47).

 

Decision

 

At this point in the development of a budget for 2021/22, to note the report and the budget cuts and savings options it contained.

 

 

122.

Growth and Development Directorate Budget Options 2021/22 pdf icon PDF 256 KB

The report of the Strategic Director Growth and Development is enclosed.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The report from the Strategic Director contained draft savings options totalling £0.773m over 2021/22-2024/25. This report on savings, income and cuts had also been considered by the Economy Scrutiny Committee at a recent meeting, and the Committee’s views on the proposals were noted (Minute ESC/20/41).

 

Decision

 

At this point in the development of a budget for 2021/22, to note the report and the budget cuts and savings options it contained.

 

 

123.

Corporate Core Budget Options 2021/22 pdf icon PDF 527 KB

The joint report of the Deputy Chief Executive and City Treasurer, and City Solicitor is enclosed.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The joint report from the City Solicitor and the Deputy Chief Executive contained draft savings options totalling £15.093m over 2021/22-2024/25. This report on savings, income and cuts had also been considered by the Resources and Governance Scrutiny Committee at a recent meeting, and the Committee’s views on the proposals were noted (Minute RGSC/20/46).

 

Decision

 

At this point in the development of a budget for 2021/22, to note the report and the budget cuts and savings options it contained.

 

 

124.

Capital Programme Update pdf icon PDF 255 KB

The report of the Deputy Chief Executive and City Treasurer is enclosed.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

A report concerning requests to increase the capital programme was submitted. We agreed to recommend two changes to the Council and to make a further three changes under delegated powers. These changes would increase Manchester City Council’s capital budget by £6.604m over the next two years, funded by capital receipts and government grants.

 

It was also reported that the Deputy Chief Executive and City Treasurer had made a further three changes using delegated powers:

              £28,000 for Enterprise Car Club Bays funded by an external contribution

              £30,000 for Electric Vehicle Charging Points funded by an external contribution

              £247,000 for the Off-Street Car Parks post joint venture project funded by borrowing

 

Decisions

 

1          To recommend that the Council approve the following changes to Manchester City Council’s capital programme:

 

a)         Children’s Services – Co-op Academy Belle Vue Permanent. A capital budget virement of £2.146m is requested, funded by Unallocated Education Basic Need budget.

 

b)         Children’s Services – Co-op Academy Belle Vue Early Opening. A capital budget virement of £2.140m is requested, funded by Unallocated Education Basic Need budget.

 

2.         Under powers delegated to the Executive, to approve the following changes to the City Council’s capital programme:

 

c)         Children’s Services – Lancasterian School Rebuild and Expansion – Pre-Development Costs. A capital budget virement of £0.140m is requested, funded by Unallocated Education Basic Need budget.

 

d)         Private Sector Housing - Next Steps Accommodation Programme (NSAP) Property Acquisitions. A capital budget increase of £2.740m is requested, funded by £1.370m Government Grant and £1.370m Capital receipts.

 

e)         Children’s Services – Co-op Academy Belle Vue. A capital budget increase of £3.864m is requested, funded by the Department for Education (DfE) Presumption Free School Grant.

 

3.         To note increases to the programme of £0.305m as a result of delegated approvals.

 

 

125.

Housing Compliance and Enforcement - HMO Standards and Licensing Policy pdf icon PDF 564 KB

The report of the Strategic Director (Neighbourhoods) is enclosed.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Council as a local housing authority is entitled to set its own standards in respect of Houses in Multiple Occupation (HMOs) within its area. Manchester's HMO standards were last reviewed in 2011/12 and were at that time substantially overhauled and simplified. Since then the private rented sector had continued to grow and recent data had shown that Manchester was the fastest growing city and third fastest growing local authority area. The private rented sector had expanded to provide homes for over 75,000 households. In October 2018 mandatory licensing of Houses in Multiple Occupation (HMOs) was extended to cover all properties with five or more occupiers living in two or more households and sharing amenities, regardless of the number of storeys. The changes had brought smaller privately rented properties into the HMO licensing regime. Due to that increase in the number of licensable HMOs a review of both the HMO standards and policy had been felt to be needed.

 

A report submitted by the Strategic Director – Neighbourhoods explained how that review had been undertaken, the public consultation that had been part of the review, and the findings and conclusions of that consultation. It was proposed and agreed that the HMO Licensing Policy be replaced by a Private Rented Sector Licensing Policy that incorporated both selective and HMO licensing and reflects recent legislative changes, and also that the HMO Standards be replaced by a refreshed HMO Standards that reflected recent legislative changes. A copy of each document was appended to the report.

 

Decisions

 

1.         To approve that the HMO Licensing Policy be replaced by a Private Rented Sector Licensing Policy.

 

2.         To approve the revised version of the HMO Standards which have been updated following consultation feedback.

 

 

126.

Draft North Manchester Health Campus Strategic Regeneration Framework pdf icon PDF 339 KB

The report of the Strategic Director Growth and Development is enclosed.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Manchester University NHS Foundation Trust (MFT) had developed a draft Strategic Regeneration Framework (SRF) to support the proposed redevelopment of the existing North Manchester General Hospital site in Crumpsall. The intention was to transform the existing site into a modern Health Campus providing high quality hospital and health facilities in addition to providing complementary commercial, leisure and retail uses set within a high quality, greener public realm and a residential offer which was best in class in terms of healthy ageing.

 

North Manchester General Hospital is an important institution in the north of the city, employing over 2,000 people. The hospital operated within much of its original estate and was in dire need of significant investment and redevelopment. The Government had committed to providing the funds for a new hospital campus.

 

The vision for the site as set out in the draft SRF included five key elements:

 

·         Healthcare Hub: A new acute hospital and a modern mental health hospital will anchor the Campus and complement the existing intermediate care facility and the new Wellbeing Hub.

 

·         Wellbeing Hub: to enable the delivery of modern, integrated community health, care and wellbeing services; responding to the specific health and care needs of the local population.

 

·         Education Hub: A new building will provide the space to support the necessary training for staff as well as an insight into future roles.

 

·         Healthy Neighbourhood Hub: this will include residential uses such as, key worker accommodation, social housing, stepdown care and extra care. There will also be the opportunity for new high-quality commercial space to support local small and medium enterprises (SMEs).

 

·         Village Green: a village green at the heart of the other four hubs, a high-quality outdoor space to act as a focal point for the overall site, available to patients, staff, visitors and residents.

 

The intention was for there to now be a period of public consultation on the draft SRF. The plans for the much-needed redevelopment of this important part of North Manchester were welcomed by the Executive, and consultation on the draft SRF was supported.

 

Decisions

 

1.         To endorse the draft North Manchester Health Campus Strategic Regeneration Framework as attached to the report as a basis for public consultation.

 

2.         To request that a further report be brought back to the Executive following the public consultation exercise, summarising the consultation responses and any amendments that have been incorporated into a final version of the SRF, which will be presented for consideration and approval.

 

 

127.

Mobility Hub Proposal - Back of Ancoats pdf icon PDF 342 KB

The report of the Strategic Director Growth and Development is enclosed.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The revised Ancoats & New Islington Neighbourhood Development Framework recognised that future development within the area would need to respond to the City Council’s objective of achieving zero-carbon target. Achieving that aspiration was going to require the active utilisation and deployment of leading building technologies. As part of that the concept of the Ancoats Mobility Hub would promote modal shift towards cycling, public transport, car clubs and walking, and enabling an accelerated take-up of electric vehicles. The vision for the hub is that it would provide cycle storage, electric vehicle charging points, and a car club location. There was also the potential for bike and e-bike hire, and a logistics hub which would include a central location for parcel deliveries, with final delivery by electric vehicle.

 

The intention was for the proof of concept and business planning work to support the delivery strategy for the Mobility Hub to be undertaken by Manchester Life Strategic Development Company (MLSDC). The costs for that were to be met from funds already committed for the master-planning of the area. A potential site had already been identified: the Industrial Estate within the back of Ancoats which was a brownfield site of 0.35Ha with the freehold interest owned by the City Council. That estate was partly occupied by the Council’s Adaptations Team in Adult Services. Three of the other units on the estate are let to a single tenant, so their relocation would need to be supported.

 

Support was given for work on the Hub to proceed to the next steps.

 

Decisions

 

1.         To note the work being undertaken to establish Proof of Concept of Ancoats Mobility Hub as an innovative approach to contributing to the Council’s Zero Carbon policy, and as a potential facility to support further residential and commercial development in Ancoats;

 

2.         To endorse further investigation into a Business Case, which will be brought back to a future meeting of the Executive for consideration.

 

3.         To authorise the Strategic Director Growth and Development, to establish a costed relocation strategy for tenants affected if the scheme is approved at a future date.

 

4.         To authorise the Strategic Director – Growth & Development to establish regulations which would be required to support the realisation of the vision for Ancoats Mobility Hub including further restrictions for on street parking in Ancoats.

 

 

128.

NOMA Strategic Regeneration Framework Update 2020 pdf icon PDF 451 KB

The report of the Strategic Director Growth and Development was to follow and is now enclosed.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The NOMA estate extends for approximately 8 hectares and is a key regeneration priority in the city centre. It is bounded to the west by Corporation Street, to the north by Angel Street and Angel Meadows, to the east by Rochdale Road and by the Metrolink line from Victoria Station and the Shudehill Interchange to the south. It is located between Victoria Station and the Northern Quarter and adjacent to the city’s retail core. In July 2020 we had approved the draft NOMA SRF Update as a basis for consultation with local stakeholders (Minute Exe/20/73). A report now submitted by the Strategic Director (Growth and Development) described the outcome of that consultation and sought the approval of the final version of the Framework.

 

The consultation had opened on 18 August 2020 and run for six weeks. Consultation letters were sent out to 3,115 local residents, landowners, businesses and stakeholders, informing them about the consultation, how to engage in the consultation process, and where to access the draft SRF. In addition to the mail out, the consultation was also hosted on the Council’s consultation webpage and a web form made available for respondents.

 

There had been 25 responses, 20 submitted by web form and 5 using email. The breakdown of respondents was

              21 from local residents

              a joint response from the Piccadilly Ward Councillors

              a response from a local resident’s group

              a response from the Council’s Housing and Residential Growth team

 

The report provided an analysis of the responses from consultees and the issues they had raised including problems from construction noise, access to green spaces, heritage conservation, traffic and highways and the intended future use of parts of the development area. The council’s responses to those issues were set out in the report. It was explained that the draft SRF had been revised and updated to take into consideration the issues that consultees had raised, and it was now proposed that this final version be agreed and adopted. That was supported.

 

Decisions

 

1.         To note the outcome of the public consultation on the draft SRF update for the NOMA area, and subsequent suggested revisions to the draft SRF Update.

 

2.         To approve the Strategic Regeneration Framework for NOMA and request that Planning and Highways Committee take the framework update into account as a material consideration when considering planning applications for the area.

 

 

129.

Withdrawn from the meeting (Efficiency Early Release Scheme)

This item of business has been withdrawn by the Chief Executive.

Additional documents:

130.

A Draft Neighbourhood Development Framework for Ardwick Green pdf icon PDF 417 KB

The report of the Strategic Director Growth and Development is now enclosed.  

Additional documents:

Minutes:

(Councillor Richards declared a personal interest in this as a member of the Board of One Manchester)

 

A draft Neighbourhood Development Framework (NDF) for Ardwick Green had been developed to guide and co-ordinate development activity in this key part of the city, in support of adopted planning policy. Proposals set out in the draft NDF had been developed following initial discussions with residents and other local stakeholders prior to a full statutory consultation exercise, which was now being proposed in a report submitted by the Strategic Director (Growth and Development).

 

The draft Ardwick Green NDF area was bounded by the Mancunian Way (A635), Ardwick Green South (A6), Union Street, Harkness Street and Dalberg Street. It included some land and property currently in a poor condition. The area to the South of Ardwick Green South had been included to join up with the Brunswick PFI area.

 

The report explained that the key objectives for the development framework were:

              To protect and preserve the area from significant development pressure due its location on the edge of the city centre, and to protect and preserve the existing community.

              To positively engage with community and interest groups in the local area to maximise the potential to create positive change, offer and allow for a community-led approach.

              To enhance opportunities for higher density commercial or residential development, envisioning that this development would seek to enhance the level of amenity for the local area, reflect the spatial context in which the opportunity exists and complement existing features and fabric of the area.

 

The area also had the capacity to help achieve the key objective of providing more affordable housing. It had the potential to accommodate new and improved social rented, affordable and market sale homes. The draft NDF envisaged the provision of a high-quality affordable housing offer close to the city centre.

 

The intention was for there to now be a period of public consultation on the draft framework document, and that was supported.

 

Decisions

 

1.         To note the short and long term ambitions of the draft NDF, together with initial considerations that will need to form part of an Implementation Strategy, as set out in section 7 of the draft document.

 

2.         To note the overarching and details objectives of the draft NDF in section 6 of the draft document.

 

3.         To endorse the draft Neighbourhood Development Framework for Ardwick Green (as appended to the report) as a basis for public consultation and note that a final version, taking account of comments and representations made, will be brought back to a future meeting of the Executive for approval.