Manchester City Council

Agenda and minutes

Agenda and minutes

Executive
Wednesday, 13th March, 2019 10.00 am

Venue: Council Antechamber. View directions

Contact: Donald Connolly 

Webcast: View the webcast

Items
No. Item

28.

Minutes pdf icon PDF 598 KB

To approve as a correct record the minutes of the meeting held on 13 February 2019

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The minutes of the meeting of the Executive on 13 February 2019 were confirmed as a correct record.

 

 

29.

Greater Manchester Clean Air Plan: Tackling Nitrogen Oxide Exceedances at the Roadside - Outline Business Case pdf icon PDF 1 MB

The report of the Deputy Chief Executive and City Solicitor is attached

Additional documents:

Minutes:

In February 2018 we had noted the emerging content of the Draft Clean Air Plan and the GM Mayor’s Congestion Plan (Minute Exe/18/022). The origin of that work had arisen from the Government’s approach to improving air quality. In July 2017, the Government had published its latest plans to improve air quality and to achieve compliance with legislation across the country. Under that plan a number of local authorities were required to produce Clean Air Plans containing measures to address the Nitrogen Dioxide (NO2) problem in their area. Included in that were seven authorities in greater Manchester: Manchester, Bolton, Bury, Salford, Stockport, Tameside and Trafford. A further direction was issued in 2018 that related to a further 33 local authorities, including Oldham in Greater Manchester. Whilst Rochdale and Wigan Councils were not compelled to act through a ministerial Direction, they each agreed to participate in the Greater Manchester-wide approach under the leadership of the Greater Manchester Combined Authority. On this basis, Greater Manchester’s collective approach to develop a city-region wide Clean Air Plan had been accepted by government, and consequently no further ministerial Directions had been issued. A letter from the Minister in January 2019 required GM’s collective Outline Business Case to address Nitrogen Dioxide be submitted to Government by end of March 2019.

 

A joint report submitted to this meeting by the Deputy Chief Executive and the City Solicitor explained the further work that had been done at the Greater Manchester level on a Clean Air Plan Outline Business Case. It also explained that the collective plan had to be accepted and adopted by each of the individual councils in Greater Manchester, or that council would face legal action if it did not then have its own Outline Business Case to present instead of being a party to the GM collective case. The report therefore proposed that the Executive adopt and approve the feasibility study and Outline Business Case (OBC) to reduce NO2 exceedances in Manchester and across Greater Manchester in the shortest possible time.

 

The report described the process that had been followed to develop the GM approach and the GM feasibility study. It had been agreed that a GM-wide approach was needed so as to avoid the risk of measures being taken in one district that just displaced pollution to another part of the city-region.

 

In their National Plan the Government had identified the areas of road within Greater Manchester where the national Pollution Climate Mapping (PCM) model predicted NO2 concentrations were likely to exceed the statutory NO2 annual mean EU Limit Value beyond 2020. The local modelling that had since been done had identified 152 stretches of road and road links where concentrations of NO2 were forecast to exceed the legal Limit Value (40 µg/m3) beyond 2020. Some 112 of these road links were in the national PCM model, which have the highest car use and heavy freight flows. The other 40 were shorter stretches of local roads,  ...  view the full minutes text for item 29.

30.

Manchester Zero Carbon 2038 - Manchester City Council's Commitment pdf icon PDF 326 KB

The report of the Head of City Policy is attached

Additional documents:

Minutes:

In February 2008 we approved 17 Principles of Tackling Climate Change in Manchester and committed the City to becoming low carbon by 2020 (Minute Exe/08/27). In January 2009 we had gone on to adopt the “Call to Action” that sought to inspire and enable stakeholders to become fully engaged in the need to undertake mainstream activities in different ways to reduce carbon (Minute Exe/09/4). In February 2014 we had approved the Climate Change Action Plan (CCAP) for 2014/15 to 2016/17 (Minute Exe/14/22). In 2015 that plan was extended to run until 2017/18 (Minute Exe/15/034). In November 2018 we had adopted the Tyndall Centre’s proposed targets and definition of zero carbon on behalf of the city. We also committed to developing a draft action plan by March 2019, and a final detailed plan by March 2020, setting out how the city will ensure that it stays within the proposed carbon budget (Minute Exe/18/101).

 

A report now submitted by the Head of City Policy sets out a framework for future action to achieve the targets set in 2018. The report also described the progress that has been made since November 2018 and the Council’s contribution to achieving the targets.

 

The report explained the recent work of the Manchester Climate Change Board (MCCB) on the development of a draft framework for the city for 2020-38 and an action plan for 2020-2022. A copy of the framework and draft action plan was appended to the report.

 

The MCCB had also developed a methodology to assist organisations across the city to develop an action plan from 2020 to 2022. The methodology being recommended to organisations was:

·         measure emissions,

·         set science-based targets,

·         explore the ‘how’,

·         enhance business case,

·         develop action plans.

 

The report also explained that MCCB had engaged with the 10 ‘pioneer’ organisations that had signed up to the zero carbon 2038 ambitions:

·         MAST (Manchester Arts Sustainability Team); 

·         Bruntwood;

·         Faith Network (Our Faith, Our Planet);

·         Healthcare (NHS);

·         Manchester City Council;

·         Manchester City Football Club;

·         Manchester Housing Providers Partnership;

·         Manchester Metropolitan University;

·         University of Manchester;

·         Electricity Northwest.

 

Those pioneers had been tasked with developing individual action plans from 2020 to 2022 detailing how they would contribute to the overall carbon saving required.

 

In a similar way, the report set out how the Council would work to develop a new Climate Change Action Plan (CCAP) to replace the existing CCAP that was first adopted in 2014.

 

It was noted that a recent meeting the Neighbourhoods and Environment Scrutiny Committee had also considered the report and had endorse its recommendations (Minute NESC/19/17).

 

The proposals were agreed.

 

Decisions

 

1.         To endorse the draft Manchester Zero Carbon Framework, as appended to the report, as the city’s overarching approach to meeting its science-based climate change targets over the period 2020-38, as part of the wider Our Manchester policy framework.

 

2.         To commit to work with partners to develop the final Framework and Action Plan for 2020-22, by March 2020 at the latest.

 

3.         To commit to implement the Council’s actions for  ...  view the full minutes text for item 30.

31.

Capital Programme Update pdf icon PDF 289 KB

The report of the City Treasurer is now enclosed

Additional documents:

Minutes:

A report concerning requests to increase the capital programme was submitted. We agreed to recommend two changes to the Council, and to make a further six changes under delegated powers. These eight changes would increase the capital budget by £4.22m, financed by the use of a mixture of reserves, borrowing, grants and the Capital Fund.

 

Decisions

 

1.         To recommend that the Council approve the following changes to Manchester City Council’s capital programme:

 

(a)        ICT – End User Experience. A capital budget allocation and transfer of £4.193m from the ICT Investment Plan budget is requested, funded by borrowing.

 

(b)        ICT – Wi-Fi Business Case. A capital budget allocation and transfer of £1.468m from the ICT Investment Plan budget is requested, funded by borrowing.

 

2.         Under delegated authority to approve the following changes to the City Council’s capital programme:

 

(c)        Strategic Development – Proud Trust Sidney Street. A capital budget increase of £0.250m is requested, funded from Capital Fund.

 

(d)        Housing – European Regional Development Fund (ERDF) Ground Source Heat Pump. A capital budget increase of £3.704m is requested, funded from ERDF Grant (£1.458m) and HRA Reserves (£2.246m).

 

(e)        Corporate Core – Manchester Jewish Museum Loan. . A capital budget increase of £0.290m is requested, funded from Capital Fund.

 

(f)        Strategic Development – Silk Street NMNB 3 Programme. A capital budget increase of £0.500m is requested, funded from HRA reserves.

 

(g)        ICT – FLARE Case Management System Replacement. A capital budget decrease of £0.440m is requested and approval of a corresponding transfer of £0.440m to the revenue budget, funded by capital fund.

 

(h)        Corporate Core – Capital Programme’s PMO Software solution. A capital budget decrease of £0.084m is requested and approval of a corresponding transfer of £0.084m to the revenue budget, funded by capital fund.

 

 

32.

Relocation of Leaving Care Services to Seymour Road pdf icon PDF 290 KB

The report of the Strategic Director of Children’s Services is now enclosed

Additional documents:

Minutes:

A report from the Strategic Director of Children and Education Services explained that an opportunity had arisen for the Leaving Care Service to have an innovative and fit for purpose location in Crumpsall. This opportunity would require the current Leaving Care Service base to transfer from Moss Side to Crumpsall. Capital investment would be needed to convert the former children's home on Seymour Road, Crumpsall to be a fit for purpose base that would include supported accommodation and trainer flats. The inclusion of supported accommodation and trainer flats would make an important contribution to preparing care leavers for adulthood whilst at the same time delivering a year on year financial saving.

 

The existing base for the service, “The Curve”, was located in Moss Side in a City Council owned building. This building was in need of a significant amount of work in order for it to be fit for purpose and meet the service expectations. The Council’s Corporate Estates Team had instead identified a suitable property in the estate that could be converted to provide a new base for the Leaving Care Service. The property, on Seymour Road in Crumpsall, would provide approximately 520 square meters of accommodation over two floors. The estimated capital budget for the conversion works was £1m to £1.2m. The report explained that alternative properties had been considered but the condition and configuration of the Seymour Road property, which had been designed as a residential home for children, would provide the best potential for a cost-effective refurbishment to relocate out of the “The Curve”. Work on an alternative use for the existing base would proceed if this relocation was approved by the Council.

 

The proposals were agreed.

 

Decisions

 

1.         To approve the relocation of the Leaving Care Service from 36 Monton Street, Moss Side to Seymour Road, Crumpsall;

 

2.         To recommend that the Council approve a capital allocation of up to £1.2m to cover any unforeseen costs, funded by prudential borrowing; and

 

3.         To recommend that the Council delegate authority to Deputy Chief Executive and City Treasurer, in consultation with Executive Member for Finance and Human Resources, to set the final budget for the project, the capital allocation and the borrowing.

 

 

33.

Great Northern Warehouse Strategic Regeneration Framework Update 2019 Consultation pdf icon PDF 263 KB

The report of the Strategic Director (Development) is attached

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Great Northern site comprises a former railway goods warehouse and sidings, which were converted into a leisure development in the late 1990’s. The warehouse is Grade II* Listed. It is adjoined to a modern extension on the south of the site, which contains the cinema complex and car parking. To the west of the site is a long terrace of Grade II Listed shops with offices above. In July 2016 we had endorsed the principles set out in a draft Great Northern, Manchester Central and Castlefield Quay Strategic Regeneration Framework (SRF) and requested that the Chief Executive to undertake a public consultation exercise on the draft SRF (Minute Exe/16/093). In February 2017 we had considered the outcome of that consultation and endorsed the principles in the revised Great Northern, Manchester Central and Castlefield Quay Strategic Regeneration Framework (Minute Exe/17/044). In December a proposed revision to that Framework 2018 had been considered and it had been agreed that there should be public consultation on the draft of the revised Framework (Minute Exe/18/113). A report now submitted by the Strategic Director (Development) set out the outcome of that consultation and proposed that the revised Framework be adopted.

 

The revised SRF had proposed the inclusion of additional commercial office space in place of an element of the previously envisaged residential use. The creation of office space as opposed to residential development within the listed warehouse would have a reduced impact on the Grade II* Listed building and reveal more of its historical significance.

 

The report explained that the consultation had run from for six weeks, closing on 25 February 2019. Consultation letters had been sent out to 1,542 local residents, landowners, businesses and stakeholders, informing them about the public consultation, how to participate, and engage in the consultation process. The draft Framework had also been made available on the Council’s website, and comments had been invited.

 

Three responses to the consultation had been received: two from residents and the third from a statutory consultee: United Utilities specifically relating to water and waste water management. One of the residents had been generally supportive of the proposed change, another was concerned about the potential impact on neighbouring residential blocks being overlooked by the new offices.

 

The report set out the proposed responses to the issues raised by the three consultees and how they would be addressed as more detailed plans were brought forward for planning permission. It was not felt that any changes to the draft SFR were required to respond to the matters that had been raised. That was agreed and the SRF was approved.

 

Decisions

 

1.         To note the outcome of the public consultation on the draft updated Development Framework for the Great Northern Warehouse.

 

2.         To approve the updated 2019 Great Northern Warehouse Strategic Regeneration Framework and request that the Planning and Highways Committee take the Framework into account as a material consideration when considering planning applications for the site.

 

 

34.

Update to the Christie Regeneration Framework pdf icon PDF 244 KB

The report of the Strategic Director (Development) is now enclosed

Additional documents:

Minutes:

In June 2014 the Christie Strategic Planning Framework (SPF) had been considered approved (Minute Exe/14/055). A report now submitted by the Chief Executive sought endorsement of a draft addendum to the Framework in order to provide a context for the redevelopment of the fire-damaged Paterson Building within the Christie site. That building had not been encompassed with the SPF when it was approved in 2014.

 

A fire in April 2017 had caused substantial damage to the Paterson Building. A review of refurbishment options had revealed that it would not be possible to repair and retain the building and that it will need to be demolished. The purpose of the proposed addendum to the SPF was to help establish how the size, form and mass of a new building would be dictated by the core cancer research functions to be accommodated inside it. It would also show how a bespoke architectural solution could ensure that floor layouts and vertical arrangements meet the specialist research, healthcare and collaboration needs, with individual labs adjacent both horizontally and vertically to allow the speed and ease of movement of people.

 

Appended to the report was a copy of the draft of the proposed addendum to the SPF. At the meeting it was explained that since the meeting papers had been published small revisions to the diagrams and text of the draft had been made, affecting only parts of pages 26 and 27 in the originally published version. Copies of the corrected version of those two pages had been made available to the members and the public at the meeting so they could consider the corrections that had been made.

 

It was explained that the intention was for there to now be a period of public consultation on the draft document, with the outcome of that consultation reported to a future meeting, along with any amendments to the draft that arose from the consultation, or for other reasons.

 

The meeting was addressed by Councillor A Simcock, the Chair of the Christie Neighbourhood Forum, a ward Councillor for Didsbury East Ward, and a member of the hospital’s Council of Governors. Councillor Simcock commended the proposed addendum to the Framework. He spoke of the hospital’s ambition be one of the finest centres for cancer research and treatment in the world, and explained how the redevelopment of the fire-damaged Peterson Building would help further those ambitions.

 

Members welcomed the proposals to further the success of the Christie Hospital as a world-class centre for cancer care and cancer research, and accepted the reasons given why this was being taken forward by way of an addendum to the existing SPF, rather than by means of a review of the entire SPF.

 

Having considered the draft of the proposed addendum to the SPF, and the corrections made since the papers had first been published, it was agreed that there should be public consultation on the draft document.

 

Decisions

 

1.         To endorse, in principle, an addendum to the Christie SPF to provide  ...  view the full minutes text for item 34.

35.

Eastlands Regeneration Framework Update pdf icon PDF 361 KB

The report of the Strategic Director (Development) is now enclosed

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Councillor Richards declared a personal interest in this item as a member of the Board of One Manchester.

 

In March 2017 a draft of the 2017 Eastlands Regeneration Framework had been considered and endorsed as the basis of further consultation with local stakeholders and landowners (Minute Exe/17/049). In December 2017, having considered the outcome of the consultation that draft had been approved and adopted (Minute Exe/17/151). As an element of the SRF, in December 2018 we had endorsed a draft Masterplan for the Etihad Campus Sport and Innovation Zone as a basis for consultation (Minutes Exe/18/083 and Exe/18/086).

 

A report submitted by the Chief Executive explained that since the Framework had been adopted in 2017 the economic environment of the city had continued to change and improve, and that the profile of Manchester, and of the ambitions for the Etihad Campus was now attracting significant interest from investors looking to develop major sports, leisure and recreation opportunities. To address these changes a new Regeneration Framework had been drafted to seek to provide further guidance for the next generation of private and public investment that will realise the overall ambitions for Eastlands and the wider East Manchester area. A copy of the draft Framework as appended to the report.

 

The draft would seek to respond to the increasing interest from national and international investors who were evaluating the Etihad Campus as a location for new entertainment and leisure offers. The report highlighted one such opportunity: a new large indoor arena with a capacity in excess of 20,000. International investors and operators were seeing Manchester as one of the few cities in Europe with the ability to successfully host more than one large arena. It was known that these investors were evaluating locational options and were addressing the detailed business case for such an investment with a view to selecting a site and bringing forward development proposals. As well as that, other facilities were being seen by investors and operators as being potentially viable propositions including a multiplex cinema, an expanded food and beverage offer, and hotel development.

 

The report also explained that the redrafting of the Framework was an opportunity to build upon the sporting success of the Etihad Campus to increase the area’s sporting strengths. With the planned investment by the Manchester Metropolitan University, the Etihad Campus was to become a home of global and national sports organisations where sports centres of excellence would thrive. Therefore, the promotion of new business and employment opportunities could potentially secure a new Sports-Tech cluster within the defined Sport and Innovation Zone, and also benefit the wider area.

 

The Ancoats, New Islington and Holt Town neighbourhoods were becoming increasingly established as locations for small creative and tech-based companies. There were emerging demands for space within the area for small businesses throughout the creative technology sector. There was also demand for larger developments and new live / work models. The draft Framework therefore proposed that the Eastlands area should now be planned to take  ...  view the full minutes text for item 35.

36.

Sale of Plot E, Birley Fields, Hulme pdf icon PDF 228 KB

The report of the Strategic Director is now enclosed

Additional documents:

Minutes:

A report by the Strategic Director (Development) sought approval for the disposal of a plot of land by way of a 250-year agreement for lease and development lease to UK Fast Properties Ltd for the expansion of their business operations. The plot was adjacent to an existing facility operated by UK Fast. This expansion would allow UK Fast to maximise the potential and connectivity of the wider site by creating a campus style development. It was hoped that this would deliver 300 additional jobs. Further expansion of the campus could follow in future phases, creating more jobs. The site would be disposed of at market value with an anticipated capital receipt of £2.45m to the Council. The proposal was agreed.

 

Decisions

 

1.         To approve the proposal to dispose of land at Plot E Birley Fields under a 250-year lease to UK Fast Properties Ltd for the expansion of the business operations on the main terms outlined in the body of the report.

 

2.         To delegate Authority to the Strategic Director (Development) in consultation with the Leader and the Deputy Leader with the Corporate Property portfolio to negotiate and agree the detailed final terms of the transaction.

 

3.         To authorise the City Solicitor to complete the necessary paperwork to give effect to the proposal.

 

 

37.

Annual update on use of Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000 ('RIPA') pdf icon PDF 221 KB

The report of the City Solicitor is attached

Additional documents:

Minutes:

A report from the City Solicitor was considered that advised us on the Council’s use of the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act (2000) (RIPA) between 1 July 2017 and 30 June 2018. In that period the Council had used covert directed surveillance once. That related to a test purchase into the alleged storage and sale of alcohol without a licence contrary to section 136 and section 138 of the Licensing Act 2003. The Council has not used RIPA powers to obtain communications data.

 

The report also proposed minor changes to the “Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000 (“RIPA”) Corporate Policy and Procedures” document. A copy of the revised document was appended to the report, highlighting the proposed changes. The revised policy and procedures were agreed.

 

Decisions

 

1.         To approve the minor revisions to the Council’s RIPA Policy appended to the report.

 

2.         To note the Council’s one use of RIPA for the period 1 July 2017 to 30 June 2018.

 

 

38.

Notice of the decisions agreed at the AGMA meeting held on 15 February 2019 pdf icon PDF 472 KB

To receive and consider the decision notice for the meeting of the GMCA on 13 February 2019

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Decision

 

To note the decisions for the meeting of the GMCA on 13 February 2019.

 

 

39.

Former Boddingtons Brewery Site - Strategic Regeneration Framework (SRF) Addendum pdf icon PDF 435 KB

The report of the Strategic Director (Development) is attached

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Councillor N Murphy in the Chair.

 

Councillor S Murphy withdrew from the meeting having declared a pecuniary interest in this matter as the Chair of the Board of the LTE Group. Councillor Akbar also left the meeting prior to this item of business being considered.

 

In October 2007 we had endorsed a development framework for the former Boddingtons Brewery Site. That framework had proposed the creation of a vibrant employment led mixed use neighbourhood with an enhanced townscape, high quality pedestrian linkages to and through the site and the development of low energy use buildings (Minute Exe/07/122). To seek to secure the appropriate redevelopment of this area, in June 2015 we had endorsed a new Development Framework for the former Boddingtons site and agreed that it be the subject of public consultation (Minute Exe/15/065). In November 2015 we had noted that there had been no responses to that consultation and the Framework had been agreed (Minute Exe/15/124).

 

A report from the Strategic Director (Development) explained that an addendum to the 2015 Framework had been drafted to address the opportunity that had arisen for the Manchester College’s decision to build a new city centre campus on the site (Minutes Exe/18/117 and Exe/18/119). The campus would promote educational use on the western part of the site and be a critical part of the College’s estate strategy, making an essential contribution to the delivery of the skills strategy for the city region. The proposals within the addendum to the SRF were therefore in line with the College's plans and would support the achievement of its objectives.

 

The intention was for the draft addendum to guide the development of the college campus, and the public realm land in the area. It would contain guidance of the size and form of the new buildings as well addressing the phasing of the overall development. It was proposed and agreed that there should be a period of public consultation of the addendum.

 

Decisions

 

1.         To approve in principle the Strategic Regeneration Framework addendum for the former Boddingtons Brewery Site.

 

2.         To request the Chief Executive undertake a public consultation exercise on the document with local stakeholders.

 

3.         To request that a further report be brought forward, following the public consultation exercise, setting out the comments received.

 

 

40.

Ethical Procurement Policy - Update on the Construction Charter pdf icon PDF 244 KB

The report of the City Treasurer is attached

Additional documents:

Minutes:

Councillor N Murphy in the Chair

 

Councillors Karney and Stogia withdrew from the meeting and took no part in this item of business. Councillor S Murphy and Akbar had withdrawn from the meeting earlier and so neither was present for this item of business.

 

Councillors Bridges, Craig and Ollerhead had all declared a pecuniary interest in this as they each had declared election expenses sponsorship from Unite. The Council’s Monitoring Officer had granted each of them a dispensation to permit them to take part in this item of business. Councillors N. Murphy, Ilyas and Rahman had each declared a personal interest in this item of business as a member of Unite.

 

A report from the Deputy Chief Executive and City Treasurer explained that Unite Union had contacted the Council as part of their campaign to contact all council and group leaders across the country to seek support to establish nationally agreed minimum workforce standards within local authority procurement policy.

 

Unite had promoted the adoption of a Construction Charter to apply to contractors, sub-contractors and their supply chain engaged on construction projects awarded by a local authority. The report explained that the Charter produced by Unite had been amended by agreement with the Council to allow more flexibility in the application of the Charter in relation to the nature of the work requiring specialist skills and experience, such as work on listed buildings and heritage buildings and assets. A copy of the amended Charter was appended to the report.

 

The City Treasurer proposed, and it was agreed, that the Council adopt the amended Charter and incorporate it into the Ethical Procurement Policy.

 

Decisions

 

1.         To agree to the Unite Construction Charter being included within the appendices of the Ethical Procurement Policy and the inclusion of the additional wording to section 6 of the policy as detailed in the report.

 

2.         To request that the Chief Executive signs the Charter on behalf of the Council to enable it to be incorporated into the Ethical Procurement Policy.